Is subsidizing vaccination with hub agent priority policy really meaningful to suppress disease spreading?

Masaki Tanaka, Jun Tanimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A Multi Agent Simulation (MAS) model that joins evolutionary game theory with epidemiological dynamics is established. Various subsidy policies that encourage vaccination are evaluated quantitatively with the model. The underlying social network topology is based on a scale-free network. Individual subsidies for vaccinations can be directed to hub agents with priority, to efficiently suppress the overall social cost of a vaccination program. These hub agents are more likely to spread both knowledge about vaccination and the disease in question. Our comprehensive simulations showed that this intuitively appealing strategy cannot be effective if the vaccination cost is low and the vaccination budget is small. Thus, we find that the hub agent priority strategy is not always effective.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110059
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume486
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 7 2020

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Game Theory
Multi-agent Simulation
Epidemiology
game theory
Vaccination
Game theory
epidemiology
vaccination
Complex networks
subsidies
Costs
Topology
Evolutionary Game Theory
Multi-agent Model
Costs and Cost Analysis
social networks
Scale-free Networks
Budgets
Network Topology
Social Support

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Statistics and Probability
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Is subsidizing vaccination with hub agent priority policy really meaningful to suppress disease spreading? / Tanaka, Masaki; Tanimoto, Jun.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 486, 110059, 07.02.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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