Ivy Cells: A Population of Nitric-Oxide-Producing, Slow-Spiking GABAergic Neurons and Their Involvement in Hippocampal Network Activity

Pablo Fuentealba, Rahima Begum, Marco Capogna, Shozo Jinno, László F. Márton, Jozsef Csicsvari, Alex Thomson, Peter Somogyi, Thomas Klausberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the cerebral cortex, GABAergic interneurons are often regarded as fast-spiking cells. We have identified a type of slow-spiking interneuron that offers distinct contributions to network activity. "Ivy" cells, named after their dense and fine axons innervating mostly basal and oblique pyramidal cell dendrites, are more numerous than the parvalbumin-expressing basket, bistratified, or axo-axonic cells. Ivy cells express nitric oxide synthase, neuropeptide Y, and high levels of GABAA receptor α1 subunit; they discharge at a low frequency with wide spikes in vivo, yet are distinctively phase-locked to behaviorally relevant network rhythms including theta, gamma, and ripple oscillations. Paired recordings in vitro showed that Ivy cells receive depressing EPSPs from pyramidal cells, which in turn receive slowly rising and decaying inhibitory input from Ivy cells. In contrast to fast-spiking interneurons operating with millisecond precision, the highly abundant Ivy cells express presynaptically acting neuromodulators and regulate the excitability of pyramidal cell dendrites through slowly rising and decaying GABAergic inputs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)917-929
Number of pages13
JournalNeuron
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 27 2008

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GABAergic Neurons
Nitric Oxide
Pyramidal Cells
Population
Interneurons
Dendrites
Theta Rhythm
Parvalbumins
Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials
Neuropeptide Y
GABA-A Receptors
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Cerebral Cortex
Neurotransmitter Agents
Axons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Ivy Cells : A Population of Nitric-Oxide-Producing, Slow-Spiking GABAergic Neurons and Their Involvement in Hippocampal Network Activity. / Fuentealba, Pablo; Begum, Rahima; Capogna, Marco; Jinno, Shozo; Márton, László F.; Csicsvari, Jozsef; Thomson, Alex; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas.

In: Neuron, Vol. 57, No. 6, 27.03.2008, p. 917-929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fuentealba, P, Begum, R, Capogna, M, Jinno, S, Márton, LF, Csicsvari, J, Thomson, A, Somogyi, P & Klausberger, T 2008, 'Ivy Cells: A Population of Nitric-Oxide-Producing, Slow-Spiking GABAergic Neurons and Their Involvement in Hippocampal Network Activity', Neuron, vol. 57, no. 6, pp. 917-929. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2008.01.034
Fuentealba, Pablo ; Begum, Rahima ; Capogna, Marco ; Jinno, Shozo ; Márton, László F. ; Csicsvari, Jozsef ; Thomson, Alex ; Somogyi, Peter ; Klausberger, Thomas. / Ivy Cells : A Population of Nitric-Oxide-Producing, Slow-Spiking GABAergic Neurons and Their Involvement in Hippocampal Network Activity. In: Neuron. 2008 ; Vol. 57, No. 6. pp. 917-929.
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