Kin-biased dispersal behaviour in the mango shield scale, Milviscutulus mangiferae

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When fitness decreases with increasing density in a habitat, dispersal behaviour is expected to evolve. To avoid competition between kin, dispersal behaviour based on kin recognition should be more likely to occur when the individuals in a habitat are closely related. I tested this prediction with first-instar larvae (crawlers) of the mango shield scale, Milviscutulus mangiferae. The body size of adult females, a measure of fecundity, was larger when only one female was present on a leaf than when two were present. When I placed two crawlers on a leaf, they emigrated more frequently when they were siblings than when they were not related. I discuss the implication of the results for kin recognition in thelytokous parthenogenetic animals. (C) 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-632
Number of pages4
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2000

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kin recognition
Mangifera
dispersal behavior
mangoes
shield
habitat
habitats
fecundity
leaves
body size
fitness
instars
larva
prediction
animal
larvae
animals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Kin-biased dispersal behaviour in the mango shield scale, Milviscutulus mangiferae. / Kasuya, Eiiti.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 59, No. 3, 01.01.2000, p. 629-632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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