Laparoscopic splenectomy may be a superior supportive intervention for cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism

Morimasa Tomikawa, Tomohiko Akahoshi, Keishi Sugimachi, Yasuharu Ikeda, Kisaku Yoshida, Yuichi Tanabe, Hirofumi Kawanaka, Kenji Takenaka, Makoto Hashizume, Yoshihiko Maehara

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37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: To evaluate and compare laparoscopic splenectomy and partial splenic embolization as supportive intervention for cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism to overcome peripheral cytopenia before the initiation of and during interferon therapy or anticancer therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Between December 2000 and April 2008, 43 Japanese cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism underwent either laparoscopic splenectomy or partial splenic embolization as a supportive intervention to facilitate the initiation and completion of either interferon therapy or anticancer therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. We reviewed the peri- and post-intervention outcomes and details of the subsequent planned main therapies. For interferon therapy, the rate of completion, the rate of treatment cessation and virological responses were evaluated. Anti-cancer therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma included liver resection, ablation therapy, intra-arterial chemotherapy, and transarterial chemoembolization. Results: All patients tolerated the operations well with no significant complications. The platelet count was significantly higher in the laparoscopic splenectomy group than in the partial splenic embolization group at 1 and 2 weeks after the intervention. Interferon therapy was stopped in two patients in the partial splenic embolization group due to recurrent thrombocytopenia whereas all patients in the laparoscopic splenectomy group completed interferon therapy. The planned anticancer therapies were performed in all patients, and were completed in all patients without any problems or major complications. Conclusion: Laparoscopic splenectomy may be superior to partial splenic embolization as a supportive intervention for cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism. Future prospective, randomized controlled patient studies are required to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-402
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2010

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Hypersplenism
Splenectomy
Interferons
Therapeutics
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Withholding Treatment
Platelet Count
Thrombocytopenia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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Laparoscopic splenectomy may be a superior supportive intervention for cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism. / Tomikawa, Morimasa; Akahoshi, Tomohiko; Sugimachi, Keishi; Ikeda, Yasuharu; Yoshida, Kisaku; Tanabe, Yuichi; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Takenaka, Kenji; Hashizume, Makoto; Maehara, Yoshihiko.

In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.01.2010, p. 397-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tomikawa, M, Akahoshi, T, Sugimachi, K, Ikeda, Y, Yoshida, K, Tanabe, Y, Kawanaka, H, Takenaka, K, Hashizume, M & Maehara, Y 2010, 'Laparoscopic splenectomy may be a superior supportive intervention for cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 397-402. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2009.06031.x
Tomikawa, Morimasa ; Akahoshi, Tomohiko ; Sugimachi, Keishi ; Ikeda, Yasuharu ; Yoshida, Kisaku ; Tanabe, Yuichi ; Kawanaka, Hirofumi ; Takenaka, Kenji ; Hashizume, Makoto ; Maehara, Yoshihiko. / Laparoscopic splenectomy may be a superior supportive intervention for cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism. In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia). 2010 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 397-402.
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