Late circadian phase in adults and children is correlated with use of high color temperature light at home at night

Shigekazu Higuchi, Sang Il Lee, Tomoaki Kozaki, Tetsuo Harada, Ikuo Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Light is the strongest synchronizer of human circadian rhythms, and exposure to residential light at night reportedly causes a delay of circadian rhythms. The present study was conducted to investigate the association between color temperature of light at home and circadian phase of salivary melatonin in adults and children. Twenty healthy children (mean age: 9.7 year) and 17 of their parents (mean age: 41.9 years) participated in the experiment. Circadian phase assessments were made with dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). There were large individual variations in DLMO both in adults and children. The average DLMO in adults and in children were 21:50 ± 1:12 and 20:55 ± 0:44, respectively. The average illuminance and color temperature of light at eye level were 139.6 ± 82.7 lx and 3862.0 ± 965.6 K, respectively. There were significant correlations between color temperature of light and DLMO in adults (r = 0.735, p < 0.01) and children (r = 0.479, p < 0.05), although no significant correlations were found between illuminance level and DLMO. The results suggest that high color temperature light at home might be a cause of the delay of circadian phase in adults and children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)448-452
Number of pages5
JournalChronobiology International
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 20 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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