Left ventricular mechanics and myocyte function after correction of experimental chronic mitral regurgitation by combined mitral valve replacement and preservation of the native mitral valve apparatus

K. Ishihara, M. R. Zile, S. Kanazawa, H. Tsutsui, Y. Urabe, G. DeFreyte, B. A. Carabello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Contractile function improves after correction of experimental mitral regurgitation, but ejection performance becomes depressed when mitral valve replacement involves chordal transection. A role for chordal transection in producing the depressed ejection performance was suspected but uncertain. Therefore, in this study, we tested two specific hypotheses: 1) that contractile function would improve and, in conjunction with chordal preservation, would allow for preserved ejection performance and 2) that improved left ventricular contractile function after surgery would be reflected in the function of myocytes isolated from the affected left ventricles. Methods and Results. We examined ventricular contractile function and ejection performance and isolated myocyte function after correction of experimental mitral regurgitation (chordal rupture) with mitral valve replacement that involved chordal preservation. After 3 months of chronic mitral regurgitation, the average regurgitant fraction of seven dogs was 0.77±0.04. End-diastolic volume had increased from 79±5 to 132±10 cm3 (p<0.05). At that time, all indexes of left ventricular contractile function were depressed. Three months after mitral valve replacement with chordal preservation, end-diastolic volume fell to 100±4 cm3 (p<0.05). At this time, all indexes of contractile function had returned to normal. End- systolic stress and ejection fraction after mitral valve replacement were similar to their baseline levels. Viscosity-velocity curves (analogous to force-velocity curves) of myocytes isolated from the affected left ventricles were similar to those of myocytes isolated from normal left ventricles. Conclusions. We conclude that mitral valve replacement with chordal preservation allows ventricular contractile function to return to normal. Normal global ventricular function, in turn, is associated with normal function of the individual myocytes that compose the left ventricular chamber. Further, chordal preservation allowed for loading and ejection performance to return to premorbid levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)II16-II25
JournalCirculation
Volume86
Issue number5 SUPPL.
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Mitral Valve Insufficiency
Mechanics
Mitral Valve
Muscle Cells
Ventricular Function
Heart Ventricles
Left Ventricular Function
Viscosity
Rupture
Dogs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Left ventricular mechanics and myocyte function after correction of experimental chronic mitral regurgitation by combined mitral valve replacement and preservation of the native mitral valve apparatus. / Ishihara, K.; Zile, M. R.; Kanazawa, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Urabe, Y.; DeFreyte, G.; Carabello, B. A.

In: Circulation, Vol. 86, No. 5 SUPPL., 01.01.1992, p. II16-II25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background. Contractile function improves after correction of experimental mitral regurgitation, but ejection performance becomes depressed when mitral valve replacement involves chordal transection. A role for chordal transection in producing the depressed ejection performance was suspected but uncertain. Therefore, in this study, we tested two specific hypotheses: 1) that contractile function would improve and, in conjunction with chordal preservation, would allow for preserved ejection performance and 2) that improved left ventricular contractile function after surgery would be reflected in the function of myocytes isolated from the affected left ventricles. Methods and Results. We examined ventricular contractile function and ejection performance and isolated myocyte function after correction of experimental mitral regurgitation (chordal rupture) with mitral valve replacement that involved chordal preservation. After 3 months of chronic mitral regurgitation, the average regurgitant fraction of seven dogs was 0.77±0.04. End-diastolic volume had increased from 79±5 to 132±10 cm3 (p<0.05). At that time, all indexes of left ventricular contractile function were depressed. Three months after mitral valve replacement with chordal preservation, end-diastolic volume fell to 100±4 cm3 (p<0.05). At this time, all indexes of contractile function had returned to normal. End- systolic stress and ejection fraction after mitral valve replacement were similar to their baseline levels. Viscosity-velocity curves (analogous to force-velocity curves) of myocytes isolated from the affected left ventricles were similar to those of myocytes isolated from normal left ventricles. Conclusions. We conclude that mitral valve replacement with chordal preservation allows ventricular contractile function to return to normal. Normal global ventricular function, in turn, is associated with normal function of the individual myocytes that compose the left ventricular chamber. Further, chordal preservation allowed for loading and ejection performance to return to premorbid levels.",
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