Limited potential of school textbooks to prevent tobacco use among students grade 1-9 across multiple developing countries: A content analysis study

Junko Saito, Daisuke Nonaka, Tetsuya Mizoue, Jun Kobayashi, Achini C. Jayatilleke, Sabina Shrestha, Kimiyo Kikuchi, Syed E. Haque, Siyan Yi, Irene Ayi, Masamine Jimba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the content of school textbooks as a tool to prevent tobacco use in developing countries. Design: Content analysis was used to evaluate if the textbooks incorporated the following five core components recommended by the WHO: (1) consequences of tobacco use; (2) social norms; (3) reasons to use tobacco; (4) social influences and (5) resistance and life skills. Setting: Nine developing countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Benin, Ghana, Niger and Zambia. Textbooks analysed: Of 474 textbooks for primary and junior secondary schools in nine developing countries, 41 were selected which contained descriptions about tobacco use prevention. Results: Of the 41 textbooks, the consequences of tobacco use component was covered in 30 textbooks (73.2%) and the social norms component was covered in 19 (46.3%). The other three components were described in less than 20% of the textbooks. Conclusions: A rather limited number of school textbooks in developing countries contained descriptions of prevention of tobacco use, but they did not fully cover the core components for tobacco use prevention. The chance of tobacco prevention education should be seized by improving the content of school textbooks.

Original languageEnglish
Article number002340
JournalBMJ open
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 19 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Textbooks
Tobacco Use
Developing Countries
Students
Laos
Cambodia
Benin
Zambia
Niger
Sri Lanka
Nepal
Ghana
Bangladesh
Tobacco
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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Limited potential of school textbooks to prevent tobacco use among students grade 1-9 across multiple developing countries : A content analysis study. / Saito, Junko; Nonaka, Daisuke; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Jun; Jayatilleke, Achini C.; Shrestha, Sabina; Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Haque, Syed E.; Yi, Siyan; Ayi, Irene; Jimba, Masamine.

In: BMJ open, Vol. 3, No. 2, 002340, 19.03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saito, J, Nonaka, D, Mizoue, T, Kobayashi, J, Jayatilleke, AC, Shrestha, S, Kikuchi, K, Haque, SE, Yi, S, Ayi, I & Jimba, M 2013, 'Limited potential of school textbooks to prevent tobacco use among students grade 1-9 across multiple developing countries: A content analysis study', BMJ open, vol. 3, no. 2, 002340. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2012-002340
Saito, Junko ; Nonaka, Daisuke ; Mizoue, Tetsuya ; Kobayashi, Jun ; Jayatilleke, Achini C. ; Shrestha, Sabina ; Kikuchi, Kimiyo ; Haque, Syed E. ; Yi, Siyan ; Ayi, Irene ; Jimba, Masamine. / Limited potential of school textbooks to prevent tobacco use among students grade 1-9 across multiple developing countries : A content analysis study. In: BMJ open. 2013 ; Vol. 3, No. 2.
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