Lipid Profiling of Serum and Lipoprotein Fractions in Response to Pitavastatin Using an Animal Model of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

Hiroaki Takeda, Yoshihiro Izumi, Shohei Tamura, Tomonari Koike, Yui Koike, Masashi Shiomi, Takeshi Bamba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Statins are widely used for the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. They inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver and cause pleiotropic effects, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. To develop novel therapeutic drugs, the effect of blood-borne lipid molecules on the pleiotropic effects of statins must be elucidated. Myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits, an animal model for hypercholesterolemia, are suitable for the determination of lipid molecules in the blood in response to statins because their lipoprotein metabolism is similar to that of humans. Herein, lipid molecules were investigated by lipidome analysis in response to pitavastatin using WHHLMI rabbits. Various lipid molecules in the blood were measured using a supercritical fluid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Cholesterol and cholesterol ester blood concentrations decreased by reducing the secretion of very low density lipoproteins from the liver. Independent of the inhibition effects of cholesterol biosynthesis, the concentrations of some lipids with anti-inflammation and antioxidant effects (phospholipid molecules with n-6 fatty acid side chains, lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens, and ceramide molecules) were significantly altered. These findings may lead to further investigation of the mechanism of statin action.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1100-1108
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Proteome Research
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 6 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Chemistry(all)

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