Long-distance endosome trafficking drives fungal effector production during plant infection

Ewa Bielska, Yujiro Higuchi, Martin Schuster, Natascha Steinberg, Sreedhar Kilaru, Nicholas J. Talbot, Gero Steinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To cause plant disease, pathogenic fungi can secrete effector proteins into plant cells to suppress plant immunity and facilitate fungal infection. Most fungal pathogens infect plants using very long strand-like cells, called hyphae, that secrete effectors from their tips into host tissue. How fungi undergo long-distance cell signalling to regulate effector production during infection is not known. Here we show that long-distance retrograde motility of early endosomes (EEs) is necessary to trigger transcription of effector-encoding genes during plant infection by the pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis. We demonstrate that motor-dependent retrograde EE motility is necessary for regulation of effector production and secretion during host cell invasion. We further show that retrograde signalling involves the mitogen-activated kinase Crk1 that travels on EEs and participates in control of effector production. Fungal pathogens therefore undergo long-range signalling to orchestrate host invasion.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5097
JournalNature communications
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2015

Fingerprint

effectors
Endosomes
infectious diseases
Fungi
Mycoses
Pathogens
fungi
Infection
Plant Immunity
Ustilago
Cell signaling
Plant Diseases
Plant Genes
Gene encoding
locomotion
pathogens
Hyphae
Plant Cells
Transcription
Mitogens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Bielska, E., Higuchi, Y., Schuster, M., Steinberg, N., Kilaru, S., Talbot, N. J., & Steinberg, G. (2015). Long-distance endosome trafficking drives fungal effector production during plant infection. Nature communications, 5, [5097]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6097

Long-distance endosome trafficking drives fungal effector production during plant infection. / Bielska, Ewa; Higuchi, Yujiro; Schuster, Martin; Steinberg, Natascha; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Talbot, Nicholas J.; Steinberg, Gero.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 5, 5097, 02.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bielska, Ewa ; Higuchi, Yujiro ; Schuster, Martin ; Steinberg, Natascha ; Kilaru, Sreedhar ; Talbot, Nicholas J. ; Steinberg, Gero. / Long-distance endosome trafficking drives fungal effector production during plant infection. In: Nature communications. 2015 ; Vol. 5.
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