Long-term results of short segmental syngeneic small intestinal transplantation: Comparison of jejunal and ileal grafts

Muhammad S. Rahman, Tomoaki Taguchi, Makoto Nakao, Takaharu Yamada, Sachiyo Suita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A short-segment intestinal graft is favorable to reduce the rate of rejection and the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in recipients of small intestine transplantation. To determine whether a jejunal or an ileal graft is preferable with respect to intestinal morphology and function, syngeneic two-step small intestinal transplantations were performed using male Lewis rats (RT11). They were divided into two groups according to the small intestine donor site (group 1 received 10 cm of jejunum; group 2 received 10 cm of ileum). There was no significant difference in the survival rate or weight gain between the two groups. Nearly all the hematologic findings, serum nutritional parameters, and results of liver function teats were normal for both groups. The only difference was that the serum total bile acid level was significantly higher in group 2. Fifty weeks after transplantation, the graft mucosa showed normal architecture, with adaptive hyperplasia of villi and crypt noted through histological study. The villus height of group 1 was 595 ± 64 μm (control, 452 ± 67 μm); that of group 2 was 732 ± 53 μm (control, 217 ± 20 μm). The crypt depth of group 1 was 228 ± 35 μm (control, 165 ± 24 μm); that of group 2 was 320 ± 19 μm (control, 102 ± 19 μm). These compensatory changes were more pronounced in group 2. The authors conclude that, on the basis of long-term functional capacity, there was no significant difference between jejunal and ileal grafts, and that both segments were suitable for transplantation. However, the ileal graft was considered to be better with respect to morphological adaptation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)908-911
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1996

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Transplantation
Transplants
Small Intestine
Graft vs Host Disease
Jejunum
Bile Acids and Salts
Serum
Ileum
Weight Gain
Hyperplasia
Mucous Membrane
Liver
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Long-term results of short segmental syngeneic small intestinal transplantation : Comparison of jejunal and ileal grafts. / Rahman, Muhammad S.; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Nakao, Makoto; Yamada, Takaharu; Suita, Sachiyo.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 31, No. 7, 01.01.1996, p. 908-911.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rahman, Muhammad S. ; Taguchi, Tomoaki ; Nakao, Makoto ; Yamada, Takaharu ; Suita, Sachiyo. / Long-term results of short segmental syngeneic small intestinal transplantation : Comparison of jejunal and ileal grafts. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 1996 ; Vol. 31, No. 7. pp. 908-911.
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