Long-term smoking causes more advanced coronary endothelial dysfunction in middle-aged smokers compared to young smokers

Masanao Naya, Koichi Morita, Keiichiro Yoshinaga, Osamu Manabe, Daisuke Goto, Kenji Hirata, Chietsugu Katoh, Nagara Tamaki, Hiroyuki Tsutsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Smoking cessation has been shown to normalize the coronary endothelial dysfunction in healthy young smokers. However, its effect has not been explored in middle-aged smokers with a longer history of smoking. Therefore, we compared the effects of smoking cessation on coronary vasomotor response between both young and middle-aged smokers and identified the predictor for its improvement. Methods This study investigated 14 young healthy smokers (age 25.2±2.3 years), 13 middle-aged smokers (age 42.0± 6.5 years) and 10 non-smokers. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was measured by using 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET). Results At baseline, the ratio of MBF during the cold pressor test (CPT) to that at rest (MBF CPT /rest), the index of coronary endothelial function, was significantly decreased in both young and middle-aged smokers compared to nonsmokers (1.24±0.20 and 1.10±0.39 vs 1.53±0.18, p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively). The ratio of MBF during adenosine triphosphate infusion to that at rest was significantly decreased in middle-aged smokers compared to young smokers and non-smokers (3.34±1.52 vs 4.43±0.92 and 4.69±1.25, p<0.05, respectively). MBF CPT /rest at 1 month after smoking cessation significantly increased in young smokers, but not in middle-aged smokers. By multivariate analysis, baseline serum malondialdehydemodified low-density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL) was an independent predictor for the changes in MBF CPT /rest after smoking cessation (β=-0.45, p<0.05). Conclusion Coronary endothelial dysfunction was reversible by short-term smoking cessation in young smokers, but not in middle-aged smokers, which was associated with serum MDA-LDL levels. Long-term smoking exposure could lead to more advanced coronary endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis possibly via oxidative stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)491-498
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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