Long-Term Stability of Oxide Nanowire Sensors via Heavily Doped Oxide Contact

Hao Zeng, Tsunaki Takahashi, Masaki Kanai, Guozhu Zhang, Yong He, Kazuki Nagashima, Takeshi Yanagida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term stability of a chemical sensor is an essential quality for long-term collection of data related to exhaled breath, environmental air, and other sources in the Internet of things (IoT) era. Although an oxide nanowire sensor has shown great potential as a chemical sensor, the long-term stability of sensitivity has not been realized yet due to electrical degradation under harsh sensing conditions. Here, we report a rational concept to accomplish long-term electrical stability of metal oxide nanowire sensors via introduction of a heavily doped metal oxide contact layer. Antimony-doped SnO2 (ATO) contacts on SnO2 nanowires show much more stable and lower electrical contact resistance than conventional Ti contacts for high temperature (200 °C) conditions, which are required to operate chemical sensors. The stable and low contact resistance of ATO was confirmed for at least 1960 h under 200 °C in open air. This heavily doped oxide contact enables us to realize the long-term stability of SnO2 nanowire sensors while maintaining the sensitivity for both NO2 gas and light (photo) detections. The applicability of our method is confirmed for sensors on a flexible polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrate. Since the proposed fundamental concept can be applied to various oxide nanostructures, it will give a foundation for designing long-term stable oxide nanomaterial-based IoT sensors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1854-1859
Number of pages6
JournalACS Sensors
Volume2
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 22 2017

Fingerprint

Oxides
Nanowires
nanowires
oxides
sensors
Sensors
Chemical sensors
Antimony
Contact resistance
antimony
contact resistance
Metals
metal oxides
Polyethylene
Air
Nanostructured materials
Contacts (fluid mechanics)
Polyethylenes
sensitivity
Nanostructures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Instrumentation
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

Cite this

Long-Term Stability of Oxide Nanowire Sensors via Heavily Doped Oxide Contact. / Zeng, Hao; Takahashi, Tsunaki; Kanai, Masaki; Zhang, Guozhu; He, Yong; Nagashima, Kazuki; Yanagida, Takeshi.

In: ACS Sensors, Vol. 2, No. 12, 22.12.2017, p. 1854-1859.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zeng, Hao ; Takahashi, Tsunaki ; Kanai, Masaki ; Zhang, Guozhu ; He, Yong ; Nagashima, Kazuki ; Yanagida, Takeshi. / Long-Term Stability of Oxide Nanowire Sensors via Heavily Doped Oxide Contact. In: ACS Sensors. 2017 ; Vol. 2, No. 12. pp. 1854-1859.
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