Male pupils taught by female homeroom teachers show a higher preference for Corporate Social Responsibility in adulthood

Eiji Yamamura, Shunsuke Managi, Yoshiro Tsutsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We test how early childhood education creates preferences for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) through teacher-student random gender matching. Using originally collected individual-level data, we examine how female teachers in elementary school influence students’ CSR stated preferences in their adulthood. Our major finding is that female teachers affect male but not female pupils’ preferences for corporate responsibility later in life, which offers new evidence from Japan for the female socialization hypothesis. Considering that class teachers are randomly assigned to pupils at entrance to elementary school, this effect is not merely associational but causal.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101048
JournalJournal of the Japanese and International Economies
Volume54
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

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social responsibility
adulthood
pupil
female teacher
elementary school
female pupil
teacher
socialization
student teacher
Japan
childhood
responsibility
gender
evidence
Corporate Social Responsibility
education
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

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abstract = "We test how early childhood education creates preferences for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) through teacher-student random gender matching. Using originally collected individual-level data, we examine how female teachers in elementary school influence students’ CSR stated preferences in their adulthood. Our major finding is that female teachers affect male but not female pupils’ preferences for corporate responsibility later in life, which offers new evidence from Japan for the female socialization hypothesis. Considering that class teachers are randomly assigned to pupils at entrance to elementary school, this effect is not merely associational but causal.",
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