Mating aggregation and copulatory success by males of the stink bug, Megacopta punctatissima (Heteroptera

Plataspidae)

Takahiro Hosokawa, Nobuhiko Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the stink bug, Megacopta punctatissima, which forms mating aggregations, male mating behaviors and the copulatory success of males were examined in experimental populations with 4 different sex ratios. In the male-biased sex ratio, more males tended to stay in "copulatory aggregations" including at least a mating pair rather than in "non-copulatory aggregations" including no mating pair, despite a scarcity of non-copulating females in such aggregations. However, when copulating females were included, there were more females in the copulatory aggregations than those in the non-copulatory aggregations. Therefore, the results appear to suggest that males also regarded copulating females as potential mates. Males which had immigrated to an aggregation showed a higher copulatory success than resident males in the aggregation at a male-biased sex ratio. Moreover, males showed a large variation in mating success, and those which had a higher mating success tended to stay in aggregations of female-biased sex ratios. These results suggest that females may choose their mates in mating aggregations, and that the choice may influence male mating success more acutely in a male-biased sex ratio.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-99
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Entomology and Zoology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Megacopta
Plataspidae
Pentatomidae
Heteroptera
sex ratio
mating behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Mating aggregation and copulatory success by males of the stink bug, Megacopta punctatissima (Heteroptera : Plataspidae). / Hosokawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Nobuhiko.

In: Applied Entomology and Zoology, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 93-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{087e140250b84d9ab178ccc266f28d91,
title = "Mating aggregation and copulatory success by males of the stink bug, Megacopta punctatissima (Heteroptera: Plataspidae)",
abstract = "In the stink bug, Megacopta punctatissima, which forms mating aggregations, male mating behaviors and the copulatory success of males were examined in experimental populations with 4 different sex ratios. In the male-biased sex ratio, more males tended to stay in {"}copulatory aggregations{"} including at least a mating pair rather than in {"}non-copulatory aggregations{"} including no mating pair, despite a scarcity of non-copulating females in such aggregations. However, when copulating females were included, there were more females in the copulatory aggregations than those in the non-copulatory aggregations. Therefore, the results appear to suggest that males also regarded copulating females as potential mates. Males which had immigrated to an aggregation showed a higher copulatory success than resident males in the aggregation at a male-biased sex ratio. Moreover, males showed a large variation in mating success, and those which had a higher mating success tended to stay in aggregations of female-biased sex ratios. These results suggest that females may choose their mates in mating aggregations, and that the choice may influence male mating success more acutely in a male-biased sex ratio.",
author = "Takahiro Hosokawa and Nobuhiko Suzuki",
year = "2000",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1303/aez.2000.93",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "93--99",
journal = "Applied Entomology and Zoology",
issn = "0003-6862",
publisher = "Japanese Society of Applied Entomology and Zoology",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mating aggregation and copulatory success by males of the stink bug, Megacopta punctatissima (Heteroptera

T2 - Plataspidae)

AU - Hosokawa, Takahiro

AU - Suzuki, Nobuhiko

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - In the stink bug, Megacopta punctatissima, which forms mating aggregations, male mating behaviors and the copulatory success of males were examined in experimental populations with 4 different sex ratios. In the male-biased sex ratio, more males tended to stay in "copulatory aggregations" including at least a mating pair rather than in "non-copulatory aggregations" including no mating pair, despite a scarcity of non-copulating females in such aggregations. However, when copulating females were included, there were more females in the copulatory aggregations than those in the non-copulatory aggregations. Therefore, the results appear to suggest that males also regarded copulating females as potential mates. Males which had immigrated to an aggregation showed a higher copulatory success than resident males in the aggregation at a male-biased sex ratio. Moreover, males showed a large variation in mating success, and those which had a higher mating success tended to stay in aggregations of female-biased sex ratios. These results suggest that females may choose their mates in mating aggregations, and that the choice may influence male mating success more acutely in a male-biased sex ratio.

AB - In the stink bug, Megacopta punctatissima, which forms mating aggregations, male mating behaviors and the copulatory success of males were examined in experimental populations with 4 different sex ratios. In the male-biased sex ratio, more males tended to stay in "copulatory aggregations" including at least a mating pair rather than in "non-copulatory aggregations" including no mating pair, despite a scarcity of non-copulating females in such aggregations. However, when copulating females were included, there were more females in the copulatory aggregations than those in the non-copulatory aggregations. Therefore, the results appear to suggest that males also regarded copulating females as potential mates. Males which had immigrated to an aggregation showed a higher copulatory success than resident males in the aggregation at a male-biased sex ratio. Moreover, males showed a large variation in mating success, and those which had a higher mating success tended to stay in aggregations of female-biased sex ratios. These results suggest that females may choose their mates in mating aggregations, and that the choice may influence male mating success more acutely in a male-biased sex ratio.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034134288&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034134288&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1303/aez.2000.93

DO - 10.1303/aez.2000.93

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 93

EP - 99

JO - Applied Entomology and Zoology

JF - Applied Entomology and Zoology

SN - 0003-6862

IS - 1

ER -