Measles antibody seropositivity among children with allergic diseases: A cross-sectional study in the Japan Environment & Children's Pilot Study

Mayako Saito-Abe, Kiwako Yamamoto-Hanada, Kensuke Shoji, Miori Sato, Makoto Irahara, Yu Taniguchi, Makiko Sekiyama, Nathan Mise, Akihiko Ikegami, Masayuki Shimono, Reiko Suga, Masafumi Sanefuji, Shouichi Ohga, Masako Oda, Hiroshi Mitsubuchi, Isao Miyairi, Yukihiro Ohya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background The relationship between allergic individuals and their responsiveness to routine vaccines has rarely been investigated. This study examined whether the seroprevalence of measles antibody differed between children with and without allergic diseases in the general pediatric population. Methods The cross-sectional study was performed within a prospective general birth cohort (a pilot study of the Japan Environment & Children's Pilot Study [JECS]) of children aged 8 years. The clinical history of allergic diseases, measles, and the concentration of measles immunoglobulin G titers in serum enzyme immunoassay were examined. Fisher's exact tests were used to assess the relationships between the allergic characteristics of the children and their measles antibody positivity rates. Results This study included 162 children. Any allergic disease was reported in 75 (46.3%). The measles antibody positivity rate was 94.7% among children with any allergic diseases and 92.0% among children without allergic diseases. Our results revealed no differences in measles antibody seropositivity between children with allergies and controls. Conclusions Children with allergies mount and maintain a comparable immune response to the measles vaccine.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0257721
JournalPloS one
Volume16
Issue number9 September
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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