Measles virus inhibits mitogen-induced T cell proliferation but does not directly perturb the T cell activation process inside the cell

Yusuke Yanagi, Beatrice A. Cubitt, Michael B.A. Oldstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Measles virus (MV) inhibits lymphocyte function in patients, as well as in cells infected in vitro. The proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T lymphocytes is suppressed by in vitro MV infection, as shown by the diminished incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA and the reduced frequency of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle, as compared with mock-infected cells. MV infection itself, however, does not completely block DNA synthesis in infected cells, because infected T cells expressing MV antigens on the cell surface, isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, could still proliferate. Northern blot analysis indicated that the expression of genes induced during T cell activation, such as those encoding interleukin 2 (IL-2), c-myc, IL-2 receptor, IL-6, c-myb, and cdc-2, was not significantly suppressed in MV-infected cells, suggesting that MV does not interfere with the T cell activation process. When anti-MV serum or carbobenzoxy-D-Phe-L-Phe-Gly, a synthetic oligopeptide known to inhibit MV-induced fusion, was added 24 hr after infection, the inhibition of T cell proliferation was reversed in a dose-dependent manner. From these results we propose a model for the inhibition of T cell proliferation by MV; MV glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface of infected cells interact with the MV receptor or other molecules on the cell membrane of adjacent T cells, which in turn affects the proliferation of those T cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)280-289
Number of pages10
JournalVirology
Volume187
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Measles virus
Mitogens
Cell Proliferation
T-Lymphocytes
Virus Diseases
phenylalanylglycine
Virus Receptors
Oligopeptides
Interleukin-2 Receptors
DNA
Phytohemagglutinins
Surface Antigens
S Phase
Northern Blotting
Thymidine
Interleukin-2
Interleukin-6
Glycoproteins
Cell Cycle
Fluorescence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Virology

Cite this

Measles virus inhibits mitogen-induced T cell proliferation but does not directly perturb the T cell activation process inside the cell. / Yanagi, Yusuke; Cubitt, Beatrice A.; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

In: Virology, Vol. 187, No. 1, 01.01.1992, p. 280-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{dbe051e2b18c43fdb042fd8524746cca,
title = "Measles virus inhibits mitogen-induced T cell proliferation but does not directly perturb the T cell activation process inside the cell",
abstract = "Measles virus (MV) inhibits lymphocyte function in patients, as well as in cells infected in vitro. The proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T lymphocytes is suppressed by in vitro MV infection, as shown by the diminished incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA and the reduced frequency of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle, as compared with mock-infected cells. MV infection itself, however, does not completely block DNA synthesis in infected cells, because infected T cells expressing MV antigens on the cell surface, isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, could still proliferate. Northern blot analysis indicated that the expression of genes induced during T cell activation, such as those encoding interleukin 2 (IL-2), c-myc, IL-2 receptor, IL-6, c-myb, and cdc-2, was not significantly suppressed in MV-infected cells, suggesting that MV does not interfere with the T cell activation process. When anti-MV serum or carbobenzoxy-D-Phe-L-Phe-Gly, a synthetic oligopeptide known to inhibit MV-induced fusion, was added 24 hr after infection, the inhibition of T cell proliferation was reversed in a dose-dependent manner. From these results we propose a model for the inhibition of T cell proliferation by MV; MV glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface of infected cells interact with the MV receptor or other molecules on the cell membrane of adjacent T cells, which in turn affects the proliferation of those T cells.",
author = "Yusuke Yanagi and Cubitt, {Beatrice A.} and Oldstone, {Michael B.A.}",
year = "1992",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0042-6822(92)90316-H",
language = "English",
volume = "187",
pages = "280--289",
journal = "Virology",
issn = "0042-6822",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measles virus inhibits mitogen-induced T cell proliferation but does not directly perturb the T cell activation process inside the cell

AU - Yanagi, Yusuke

AU - Cubitt, Beatrice A.

AU - Oldstone, Michael B.A.

PY - 1992/1/1

Y1 - 1992/1/1

N2 - Measles virus (MV) inhibits lymphocyte function in patients, as well as in cells infected in vitro. The proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T lymphocytes is suppressed by in vitro MV infection, as shown by the diminished incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA and the reduced frequency of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle, as compared with mock-infected cells. MV infection itself, however, does not completely block DNA synthesis in infected cells, because infected T cells expressing MV antigens on the cell surface, isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, could still proliferate. Northern blot analysis indicated that the expression of genes induced during T cell activation, such as those encoding interleukin 2 (IL-2), c-myc, IL-2 receptor, IL-6, c-myb, and cdc-2, was not significantly suppressed in MV-infected cells, suggesting that MV does not interfere with the T cell activation process. When anti-MV serum or carbobenzoxy-D-Phe-L-Phe-Gly, a synthetic oligopeptide known to inhibit MV-induced fusion, was added 24 hr after infection, the inhibition of T cell proliferation was reversed in a dose-dependent manner. From these results we propose a model for the inhibition of T cell proliferation by MV; MV glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface of infected cells interact with the MV receptor or other molecules on the cell membrane of adjacent T cells, which in turn affects the proliferation of those T cells.

AB - Measles virus (MV) inhibits lymphocyte function in patients, as well as in cells infected in vitro. The proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T lymphocytes is suppressed by in vitro MV infection, as shown by the diminished incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA and the reduced frequency of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle, as compared with mock-infected cells. MV infection itself, however, does not completely block DNA synthesis in infected cells, because infected T cells expressing MV antigens on the cell surface, isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, could still proliferate. Northern blot analysis indicated that the expression of genes induced during T cell activation, such as those encoding interleukin 2 (IL-2), c-myc, IL-2 receptor, IL-6, c-myb, and cdc-2, was not significantly suppressed in MV-infected cells, suggesting that MV does not interfere with the T cell activation process. When anti-MV serum or carbobenzoxy-D-Phe-L-Phe-Gly, a synthetic oligopeptide known to inhibit MV-induced fusion, was added 24 hr after infection, the inhibition of T cell proliferation was reversed in a dose-dependent manner. From these results we propose a model for the inhibition of T cell proliferation by MV; MV glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface of infected cells interact with the MV receptor or other molecules on the cell membrane of adjacent T cells, which in turn affects the proliferation of those T cells.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026582218&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026582218&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0042-6822(92)90316-H

DO - 10.1016/0042-6822(92)90316-H

M3 - Article

C2 - 1736530

AN - SCOPUS:0026582218

VL - 187

SP - 280

EP - 289

JO - Virology

JF - Virology

SN - 0042-6822

IS - 1

ER -