Measurements of CO2 molecular diffusion coefficients in crude oils from swelling-time curve and estimation using viscosity from the Stokes-Einstein formula

Ronald Ssebadduka, Hiroyuki Kono, K. Sasaki, Yuichi Sugai, Ronald Nguele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The CO2 diffusion coefficients in crude oils were measured from curves of oil-swelling vs. elapsed time with CO2 dissolution in the oils. The oil swelling was measured with CO2 up to a pressure of 10 MPa at 50 °C. The swelling coefficient and diffusion coefficient of CO2 and CH4 gases in the oil column were compared with CH4 gas. The diffusion coefficient of the heavy oil was evaluated as approximately 1.1–1.6% of that of bitumen. The swelling factors increased with pressure, and the diffusion coefficients in CO2 supercritical range were more than twice as high as those in the CO2 gas phase. An empirical equation to estimate gas solubility in crude oils vs. API gravity has been presented as well. Gas diffusion coefficients were shown to relate to oil viscosity based on the Stokes-Einstein formula and a new correlation between the two with the absolute average deviation (AAD%) of about 15.5%, derived.
Original languageEnglish
Article number106823
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Petroleum Science and Engineering
Volume187
Issue number106823
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020

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Stokes formula
swelling
crude oil
Swelling
viscosity
Crude oil
Viscosity
oil
gas
Gases
Diffusion in gases
bitumen
heavy oil
Application programming interfaces (API)
Gravitation
Dissolution
solubility
Solubility
dissolution
Oils

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Fuel Technology

Cite this

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title = "Measurements of CO2 molecular diffusion coefficients in crude oils from swelling-time curve and estimation using viscosity from the Stokes-Einstein formula",
abstract = "The CO2 diffusion coefficients in crude oils were measured from curves of oil-swelling vs. elapsed time with CO2 dissolution in the oils. The oil swelling was measured with CO2 up to a pressure of 10 MPa at 50 °C. The swelling coefficient and diffusion coefficient of CO2 and CH4 gases in the oil column were compared with CH4 gas. The diffusion coefficient of the heavy oil was evaluated as approximately 1.1–1.6{\%} of that of bitumen. The swelling factors increased with pressure, and the diffusion coefficients in CO2 supercritical range were more than twice as high as those in the CO2 gas phase. An empirical equation to estimate gas solubility in crude oils vs. API gravity has been presented as well. Gas diffusion coefficients were shown to relate to oil viscosity based on the Stokes-Einstein formula and a new correlation between the two with the absolute average deviation (AAD{\%}) of about 15.5{\%}, derived.",
author = "Ronald Ssebadduka and Hiroyuki Kono and K. Sasaki and Yuichi Sugai and Ronald Nguele",
year = "2020",
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doi = "10.1016/j.petrol.2019.106823",
language = "English",
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issn = "0920-4105",
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T1 - Measurements of CO2 molecular diffusion coefficients in crude oils from swelling-time curve and estimation using viscosity from the Stokes-Einstein formula

AU - Ssebadduka, Ronald

AU - Kono, Hiroyuki

AU - Sasaki, K.

AU - Sugai, Yuichi

AU - Nguele, Ronald

PY - 2020/4

Y1 - 2020/4

N2 - The CO2 diffusion coefficients in crude oils were measured from curves of oil-swelling vs. elapsed time with CO2 dissolution in the oils. The oil swelling was measured with CO2 up to a pressure of 10 MPa at 50 °C. The swelling coefficient and diffusion coefficient of CO2 and CH4 gases in the oil column were compared with CH4 gas. The diffusion coefficient of the heavy oil was evaluated as approximately 1.1–1.6% of that of bitumen. The swelling factors increased with pressure, and the diffusion coefficients in CO2 supercritical range were more than twice as high as those in the CO2 gas phase. An empirical equation to estimate gas solubility in crude oils vs. API gravity has been presented as well. Gas diffusion coefficients were shown to relate to oil viscosity based on the Stokes-Einstein formula and a new correlation between the two with the absolute average deviation (AAD%) of about 15.5%, derived.

AB - The CO2 diffusion coefficients in crude oils were measured from curves of oil-swelling vs. elapsed time with CO2 dissolution in the oils. The oil swelling was measured with CO2 up to a pressure of 10 MPa at 50 °C. The swelling coefficient and diffusion coefficient of CO2 and CH4 gases in the oil column were compared with CH4 gas. The diffusion coefficient of the heavy oil was evaluated as approximately 1.1–1.6% of that of bitumen. The swelling factors increased with pressure, and the diffusion coefficients in CO2 supercritical range were more than twice as high as those in the CO2 gas phase. An empirical equation to estimate gas solubility in crude oils vs. API gravity has been presented as well. Gas diffusion coefficients were shown to relate to oil viscosity based on the Stokes-Einstein formula and a new correlation between the two with the absolute average deviation (AAD%) of about 15.5%, derived.

U2 - 10.1016/j.petrol.2019.106823

DO - 10.1016/j.petrol.2019.106823

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