Mechanism of skull suture maintenance and interdigitation

Takashi Miura, Chad A. Perlyn, Masato Kinboshi, Naomichi Ogihara, Mikiko Kobayashi-Miura, Gillian M. Morriss-Kay, Kohei Shiota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Skull sutures serve as growth centers whose function involves multiple molecular pathways. During periods of brain growth the sutures remain thin and straight, later developing complex fractal interdigitations that provide interlocking strength. The nature of the relationship between the molecular interactions and suture pattern formation is not understood. Here we show that by classifying the molecules involved into two groups, stabilizing factors and substrate molecules, complex molecular networks can be modeled by a simple two-species reaction-diffusion model that recapitulates all the known behavior of suture pattern formation. This model reproduces the maintenance of thin sutural tissue at early stages, the later modification of the straight suture to form osseous interdigitations, and the formation of fractal structures. Predictions from the model are in good agreement with experimental observations, indicating that the model captures the essential nature of the interdigitation process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)642-655
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Anatomy
Volume215
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

sutures
skull
Skull
Sutures
Maintenance
Fractals
brain
Growth
substrate
prediction
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Histology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Miura, T., Perlyn, C. A., Kinboshi, M., Ogihara, N., Kobayashi-Miura, M., Morriss-Kay, G. M., & Shiota, K. (2009). Mechanism of skull suture maintenance and interdigitation. Journal of Anatomy, 215(6), 642-655. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01148.x

Mechanism of skull suture maintenance and interdigitation. / Miura, Takashi; Perlyn, Chad A.; Kinboshi, Masato; Ogihara, Naomichi; Kobayashi-Miura, Mikiko; Morriss-Kay, Gillian M.; Shiota, Kohei.

In: Journal of Anatomy, Vol. 215, No. 6, 01.12.2009, p. 642-655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miura, T, Perlyn, CA, Kinboshi, M, Ogihara, N, Kobayashi-Miura, M, Morriss-Kay, GM & Shiota, K 2009, 'Mechanism of skull suture maintenance and interdigitation', Journal of Anatomy, vol. 215, no. 6, pp. 642-655. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01148.x
Miura T, Perlyn CA, Kinboshi M, Ogihara N, Kobayashi-Miura M, Morriss-Kay GM et al. Mechanism of skull suture maintenance and interdigitation. Journal of Anatomy. 2009 Dec 1;215(6):642-655. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01148.x
Miura, Takashi ; Perlyn, Chad A. ; Kinboshi, Masato ; Ogihara, Naomichi ; Kobayashi-Miura, Mikiko ; Morriss-Kay, Gillian M. ; Shiota, Kohei. / Mechanism of skull suture maintenance and interdigitation. In: Journal of Anatomy. 2009 ; Vol. 215, No. 6. pp. 642-655.
@article{942d7cc72b8d41f5aa36e9433dc05a22,
title = "Mechanism of skull suture maintenance and interdigitation",
abstract = "Skull sutures serve as growth centers whose function involves multiple molecular pathways. During periods of brain growth the sutures remain thin and straight, later developing complex fractal interdigitations that provide interlocking strength. The nature of the relationship between the molecular interactions and suture pattern formation is not understood. Here we show that by classifying the molecules involved into two groups, stabilizing factors and substrate molecules, complex molecular networks can be modeled by a simple two-species reaction-diffusion model that recapitulates all the known behavior of suture pattern formation. This model reproduces the maintenance of thin sutural tissue at early stages, the later modification of the straight suture to form osseous interdigitations, and the formation of fractal structures. Predictions from the model are in good agreement with experimental observations, indicating that the model captures the essential nature of the interdigitation process.",
author = "Takashi Miura and Perlyn, {Chad A.} and Masato Kinboshi and Naomichi Ogihara and Mikiko Kobayashi-Miura and Morriss-Kay, {Gillian M.} and Kohei Shiota",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01148.x",
language = "English",
volume = "215",
pages = "642--655",
journal = "Journal of Anatomy",
issn = "0021-8782",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanism of skull suture maintenance and interdigitation

AU - Miura, Takashi

AU - Perlyn, Chad A.

AU - Kinboshi, Masato

AU - Ogihara, Naomichi

AU - Kobayashi-Miura, Mikiko

AU - Morriss-Kay, Gillian M.

AU - Shiota, Kohei

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Skull sutures serve as growth centers whose function involves multiple molecular pathways. During periods of brain growth the sutures remain thin and straight, later developing complex fractal interdigitations that provide interlocking strength. The nature of the relationship between the molecular interactions and suture pattern formation is not understood. Here we show that by classifying the molecules involved into two groups, stabilizing factors and substrate molecules, complex molecular networks can be modeled by a simple two-species reaction-diffusion model that recapitulates all the known behavior of suture pattern formation. This model reproduces the maintenance of thin sutural tissue at early stages, the later modification of the straight suture to form osseous interdigitations, and the formation of fractal structures. Predictions from the model are in good agreement with experimental observations, indicating that the model captures the essential nature of the interdigitation process.

AB - Skull sutures serve as growth centers whose function involves multiple molecular pathways. During periods of brain growth the sutures remain thin and straight, later developing complex fractal interdigitations that provide interlocking strength. The nature of the relationship between the molecular interactions and suture pattern formation is not understood. Here we show that by classifying the molecules involved into two groups, stabilizing factors and substrate molecules, complex molecular networks can be modeled by a simple two-species reaction-diffusion model that recapitulates all the known behavior of suture pattern formation. This model reproduces the maintenance of thin sutural tissue at early stages, the later modification of the straight suture to form osseous interdigitations, and the formation of fractal structures. Predictions from the model are in good agreement with experimental observations, indicating that the model captures the essential nature of the interdigitation process.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=71049119434&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=71049119434&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01148.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01148.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 19811566

AN - SCOPUS:71049119434

VL - 215

SP - 642

EP - 655

JO - Journal of Anatomy

JF - Journal of Anatomy

SN - 0021-8782

IS - 6

ER -