Melting and evaporating sodium tellurite melts in low gravity drop shaft

Masaki Makihara, Chandra S. Ray, Delbert E. Day

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glasses of Na2O · xTeO2(x=2,4, and 6) compositions were remelted and evaporated while supported by a platinum heater coil in the low gravity (approx. 10-5 g) drop shaft at the Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC). The evaporating species from all the melts, which formed a spherical cloud surrounding the melt during the few seconds low gravity time were identified to be amorphous particles of TeO2. These particles were highly spherical, 5 to 10μm in diameter, and were, on the average, 6 to 8 times larger than the particles grown from similar experiments at 1-g. The melt remaining after evaporation was splattered on to a glass plate positioned at about 3.5 cm directly below the melt during the high-g (approx. 8 to 10 g) deceleration of the drop capsule and crystallized almost instantaneously. The chemical composition of the crystallized splatters was same as that of the starting glass. The crystallization tendency of these sodium tellurite splatters was estimated to be at least 1000 times greater than that of an identical melt at 1-g. No suitable explanation was found for the high crystallization tendency of the drop shaft splatters, but a sudden 5 orders of magnitude increase in the gravity level is suspected to be a contributing factor for this effect.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Pages209-217
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)0819432784, 9780819432780
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 Materials Research in Low Gravity II - Denver, CO, USA
Duration: Jul 19 1999Jul 21 1999

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume3792
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 Materials Research in Low Gravity II
CityDenver, CO, USA
Period7/19/997/21/99

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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