Microarray analysis reveals S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase involvement in salt tolerance of Cyanidioschyzon merolae

Takayuki Sakajiri, Keita Asano, Shunsuke Hirooka, Kosuke Tashiro, Osami Misumi, Takayuki Fujiwara, Tsuneyoshi Kuroiwa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We searched for candidate genes for producing salt tolerant plants from the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, which lives in an extreme environment (hot springs). Arabidopsis thaliana plants die under 0.1 M salt culture, whereas the red algal cells survived under 0.3 M salt for 7d. However, their chloroplasts changed from green to white and they soon died under 0.4 M, which is the concentration of seawater. Genes that were selectively expressed at 2 h and 24 h in 0.3 M salt concentrations were examined by microarray analysis. Under salt stress, the numbers of highly expressed genes at 2 h increased from 70 to 95 after culture for 24 h. The highly expressed genes included those encoding proteins similar to low molecular weight heat shock proteins, heat shock protein 70, and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase. On the base of the present data and on the known metabolic functions of the proteins, we suggest that the SAM synthetase gene from C. merolae is a candidate gene for genetic engineering to produce salt tolerance plants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-348
Number of pages8
JournalCytologia
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2008

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Methionine Adenosyltransferase
methionine adenosyltransferase
Salt-Tolerance
Microarray Analysis
salt tolerance
Salts
Genes
genes
Protein S
salts
Salt-Tolerant Plants
Hot Springs
Rhodophyta
hot springs
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins
Genetic Engineering
Seawater
Chloroplasts
Heat-Shock Proteins
salt concentration

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cell Biology
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Microarray analysis reveals S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase involvement in salt tolerance of Cyanidioschyzon merolae. / Sakajiri, Takayuki; Asano, Keita; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Tashiro, Kosuke; Misumi, Osami; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi.

In: Cytologia, Vol. 73, No. 3, 01.09.2008, p. 341-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sakajiri, Takayuki ; Asano, Keita ; Hirooka, Shunsuke ; Tashiro, Kosuke ; Misumi, Osami ; Fujiwara, Takayuki ; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi. / Microarray analysis reveals S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase involvement in salt tolerance of Cyanidioschyzon merolae. In: Cytologia. 2008 ; Vol. 73, No. 3. pp. 341-348.
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