Modeling seasonal changes in the temperature lapse rate in a Northern Thailand mountainous area

Hikaru Komatsu, Hirofumi Hashimoto, Tomonori Kume, Nobuaki Tanaka, Natsuko Yoshifuji, Kyoichi Otsuki, Masakazu Suzuki, Tomo'omi Kumagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Temperature data in the mountain forest regions are often extrapolated from temperature data recorded at base stations at lower elevation. Such extrapolation is often based on elevation differences between target regions and base stations at low elevation assuming a constant temperature lapse rate throughout the year. However, this assumption might be problematic where slope circulation is active and decoupled from the regional circulation. To model the seasonal change in the lapse rate, the authors compared daily maximum (Tmax) and minimum temperatures (Tmin) observed at a mountain forest site (Kog-Ma; 1300-m altitude) with those observed at the bottom of the basin (Chiang-Mai; 314-m altitude) in northern Thailand, where slope circulation is active and decoupled from the regional circulation. The difference in Tmax between Kog-Ma and Chiang-Mai (ΔTmax; Kog-Ma minus Chiang-Mai) was relatively unchanged throughout the year. However, the difference in Tmin between Kog-Ma and Chiang-Mai (ΔTmin) changed seasonally. Thus, assuming a constant lapse rate throughout the year could cause large errors in extrapolating Tmin data in mountainous areas in northern Thailand. The difference ΔTmin was related to nighttime net radiation (Rn), suggesting that nocturnal drainage flow affects the determination of ΔTmin. This relationship would be useful in formulating seasonal changes in the lapse rate for Tmin. As Rn data are generally unavailable for meteorological stations, an index that relates to the lapse rate for Tmin and is calculated from Tmax and Tmin data is proposed. This index might be useful for accurately estimating Tmin values in mountainous regions in northern Thailand.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1233-1246
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

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