Modelling and verification of driving torque management for electric tractor

Dual-mode driving intention interpretation with torque demand restriction

Zhongbin Wu, Bin Xie, Zhen Li, Ruijuan Chi, Zhiyong Ren, Yuefeng Du, Eiji Inoue, Mitsuoka Muneshi, Takashi Okayasu, Hirai Yasumaru

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A torque management model (TMM) focused on the close matching of driving requirements and operating conditions for electric tractors was developed. The TMM used the accelerator pedal output signal to establish the torque demand to adapt for two conditions – field traction and road driving. Further, the TMM uses the limitations of a time-based torque ramp, maximum motor torque at the current speed, and battery state of charge. To verify the performance of the TMM, a tractor control unit (TCU) to support the TMM was designed, and a test bench comprising both driving and loading devices was built. The bench provided the TMM/TCU with the necessary operating states needed as inputs to determine the torque demand. Experiments were performed under five specific manoeuvring cases. The test results showed that the TMM was capable of accurately converting pedal manipulations into torque demands both in the field traction and road driving conditions. The torque changes during testing were properly smoothed by limiting the rising and falling time of the target torque, which was favourable for eliminating impacts due to torque fluctuations. Overloading operations that would occur in case of excessive torque request were avoided by the torque capacity limitation both in the field traction and road acceleration tests. When the bus voltage was deliberately adjusted below the alarm threshold, the TMM could scale down the torque demand in real time according to the deviation between the actual voltage and the threshold, and therefore, it always kept the voltage above the safe level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-83
Number of pages19
JournalBiosystems Engineering
Volume182
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2019

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torque
Torque
tractors
modeling
traction (mechanics)
Traction (friction)
Traction
demand
roads
road
Foot
Electric potential
testing
Torque motors
Architectural Accessibility
Motor Vehicles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Modelling and verification of driving torque management for electric tractor : Dual-mode driving intention interpretation with torque demand restriction. / Wu, Zhongbin; Xie, Bin; Li, Zhen; Chi, Ruijuan; Ren, Zhiyong; Du, Yuefeng; Inoue, Eiji; Muneshi, Mitsuoka; Okayasu, Takashi; Yasumaru, Hirai.

In: Biosystems Engineering, Vol. 182, 01.06.2019, p. 65-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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