Modelling the flexural buckling failure of stratified rock slopes based on the multilayer beam model

Yan jun Zhang, Ting kai Nian, Xing sen Guo, Guang qi Chen, Lu Zheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The buckling failure of stratified rock slopes intersected by a set of steep discontinuities that are approximately parallel to the slope surface is frequently encountered while constructing railways and roadways in mountainous areas. In this study, an analytical approach based on the energy equilibrium principle is presented to solve the flexural buckling stability of stratified rock slopes within the framework of multilayer beam theory. The generalized Hoek-Brown failure criterion is introduced to reflect the influences of slope size (scale effects) on the buckling stability. Subsequently, numerical and physical modellings from previous literatures are employed to validate the proposed approach. Furthermore, a practical case of Bawang Mountain landslide is also used for the comparative analysis. The study shows that the present analytical approach is capable to provide a more reasonable assessment for the buckling failure of stratified rock slopes, compared with several existing analytical approaches. Finally, a detailed parametric study is implemented, and the results indicate that the effects of rock strength, rock deformation modulus, geological strength index, layer thickness and disturbance degree of rock mass on the buckling failure of stratified rock slopes are more significant than that of rock type and slope angle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1170-1183
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Mountain Science
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Geology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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