More Highly Female-Biased Sex Ratio in the Fig Wasp, Blastophaga nipponica Grandi (Agaonidae)

Motoaki Kinoshita, Eiiti Kasuya, Tetsukazu Yahara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The sex ratio of the pollinator fig wasp, Blastophaga nipponica Grandi (Agaonidae), was examined in an experiment manipulating the number of foundresses. The sex ratio of B. nipponica was conditional on the number of foundresses and corresponded to the qualitative prediction of the local mate competition (LMC) theory that the proportion of males increases as foundress number increases. However, the sex ratio of B, nipponica was consistently more female-biased than predicted by extended LMC theories that incorporated effects of inbreeding, and these deviations were statistically significant. Plausible factors that would make predictions more female-biased are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-242
Number of pages4
JournalResearches on Population Ecology
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1998

Fingerprint

Blastophaga
Agaonidae
Ficus
Wasps
Sex Ratio
wasp
sex ratio
Inbreeding
prediction
pollinating insects
inbreeding
pollinator
experiment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

More Highly Female-Biased Sex Ratio in the Fig Wasp, Blastophaga nipponica Grandi (Agaonidae). / Kinoshita, Motoaki; Kasuya, Eiiti; Yahara, Tetsukazu.

In: Researches on Population Ecology, Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 239-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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