Motivations for exiting hog production in the 1990s and incentives for re-entry

John D. Lawrence, Erda Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey of Iowa farmers who quit raising hogs between 1991–1997 quantified the demographics of the enterprises and operators, motivations for leaving, and prospects for re-entering hog production. The median enterprise size was 500 head marketed a year, yet hogs accounted for 40% of farm income. While 30% increased another enterprise or off-farm employment, 45% reported simply working less. Economic forces were cited for quitting hogs, but over 80% of the farmers did not know their cost of production. Higher operating margins and restrictions on competition were needed before these farmers would produce hogs again.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-465
Number of pages13
JournalAgribusiness
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1998

Fingerprint

off-farm employment
occupational reintegration
Motivation
incentive
farmer
income
farm
swine
economics
cost
farmers
Head
Economics
Demography
farm income
Costs and Cost Analysis
production costs
costs
demographic statistics
restriction on competition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Motivations for exiting hog production in the 1990s and incentives for re-entry. / Lawrence, John D.; Wang, Erda.

In: Agribusiness, Vol. 14, No. 6, 01.01.1998, p. 453-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lawrence, John D. ; Wang, Erda. / Motivations for exiting hog production in the 1990s and incentives for re-entry. In: Agribusiness. 1998 ; Vol. 14, No. 6. pp. 453-465.
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