Multinational life satisfaction, perceived inequality and energy affordability

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We analyse subjective experiences of energy poverty to address the limitations of existing observable indicators as evidence for policy. We investigate the linkage between self-reported energy affordability and life satisfaction, health and economic inequality. A large-scale survey of 100,956 respondents across 37 nations shows that energy affordability concerns individuals in both developing and developed nations. Self-reported (perceived) values do not necessarily follow previous research and vary according to regional, economic, development and cultural factors. Contrasting this evidence with national-level data, such as healthy life expectancy and government spending on health and welfare, we identify associations between self-reported outcomes, income levels and national policy. Although national welfare spending can reduce the perceived economic gap, high income is not necessarily associated with better perceived satisfaction, health or economic outcomes. Enhancing energy access may lead to improved health outcomes in the most marginalized nations; however, lifestyle and cultural factors also play a role. Although the outcomes of less-developed nations can likely improve through development aid from more-developed nations, our results show that cultural and other factors underpin satisfaction in developing nations, which experience comparatively poorer life satisfaction. We identified that some nations had superior outcomes for health and life satisfaction despite lower income levels. This highlights the need for further research to uncover non-income-based factors that underlie life satisfaction and health, such as community connectedness or familial factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)508-514
Number of pages7
JournalNature Sustainability
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2019

Fingerprint

affordability
Health
developed countries
energy
income
Developing Countries
developing countries
health
Economics
regional economics
Developed Countries
development aid
economics
cultural factors
poverty
economic development
lifestyle
welfare
Economic Development
life expectancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Food Science
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Ecology
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Urban Studies
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Multinational life satisfaction, perceived inequality and energy affordability. / Chapman, Andrew; Fujii, Hidemichi; Managi, Shunsuke.

In: Nature Sustainability, Vol. 2, No. 6, 01.06.2019, p. 508-514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{790ab3486b8346138661d61dd58bbd8b,
title = "Multinational life satisfaction, perceived inequality and energy affordability",
abstract = "We analyse subjective experiences of energy poverty to address the limitations of existing observable indicators as evidence for policy. We investigate the linkage between self-reported energy affordability and life satisfaction, health and economic inequality. A large-scale survey of 100,956 respondents across 37 nations shows that energy affordability concerns individuals in both developing and developed nations. Self-reported (perceived) values do not necessarily follow previous research and vary according to regional, economic, development and cultural factors. Contrasting this evidence with national-level data, such as healthy life expectancy and government spending on health and welfare, we identify associations between self-reported outcomes, income levels and national policy. Although national welfare spending can reduce the perceived economic gap, high income is not necessarily associated with better perceived satisfaction, health or economic outcomes. Enhancing energy access may lead to improved health outcomes in the most marginalized nations; however, lifestyle and cultural factors also play a role. Although the outcomes of less-developed nations can likely improve through development aid from more-developed nations, our results show that cultural and other factors underpin satisfaction in developing nations, which experience comparatively poorer life satisfaction. We identified that some nations had superior outcomes for health and life satisfaction despite lower income levels. This highlights the need for further research to uncover non-income-based factors that underlie life satisfaction and health, such as community connectedness or familial factors.",
author = "Andrew Chapman and Hidemichi Fujii and Shunsuke Managi",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41893-019-0303-5",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "508--514",
journal = "Nature Sustainability",
issn = "2398-9629",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multinational life satisfaction, perceived inequality and energy affordability

AU - Chapman, Andrew

AU - Fujii, Hidemichi

AU - Managi, Shunsuke

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - We analyse subjective experiences of energy poverty to address the limitations of existing observable indicators as evidence for policy. We investigate the linkage between self-reported energy affordability and life satisfaction, health and economic inequality. A large-scale survey of 100,956 respondents across 37 nations shows that energy affordability concerns individuals in both developing and developed nations. Self-reported (perceived) values do not necessarily follow previous research and vary according to regional, economic, development and cultural factors. Contrasting this evidence with national-level data, such as healthy life expectancy and government spending on health and welfare, we identify associations between self-reported outcomes, income levels and national policy. Although national welfare spending can reduce the perceived economic gap, high income is not necessarily associated with better perceived satisfaction, health or economic outcomes. Enhancing energy access may lead to improved health outcomes in the most marginalized nations; however, lifestyle and cultural factors also play a role. Although the outcomes of less-developed nations can likely improve through development aid from more-developed nations, our results show that cultural and other factors underpin satisfaction in developing nations, which experience comparatively poorer life satisfaction. We identified that some nations had superior outcomes for health and life satisfaction despite lower income levels. This highlights the need for further research to uncover non-income-based factors that underlie life satisfaction and health, such as community connectedness or familial factors.

AB - We analyse subjective experiences of energy poverty to address the limitations of existing observable indicators as evidence for policy. We investigate the linkage between self-reported energy affordability and life satisfaction, health and economic inequality. A large-scale survey of 100,956 respondents across 37 nations shows that energy affordability concerns individuals in both developing and developed nations. Self-reported (perceived) values do not necessarily follow previous research and vary according to regional, economic, development and cultural factors. Contrasting this evidence with national-level data, such as healthy life expectancy and government spending on health and welfare, we identify associations between self-reported outcomes, income levels and national policy. Although national welfare spending can reduce the perceived economic gap, high income is not necessarily associated with better perceived satisfaction, health or economic outcomes. Enhancing energy access may lead to improved health outcomes in the most marginalized nations; however, lifestyle and cultural factors also play a role. Although the outcomes of less-developed nations can likely improve through development aid from more-developed nations, our results show that cultural and other factors underpin satisfaction in developing nations, which experience comparatively poorer life satisfaction. We identified that some nations had superior outcomes for health and life satisfaction despite lower income levels. This highlights the need for further research to uncover non-income-based factors that underlie life satisfaction and health, such as community connectedness or familial factors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067241158&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85067241158&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41893-019-0303-5

DO - 10.1038/s41893-019-0303-5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85067241158

VL - 2

SP - 508

EP - 514

JO - Nature Sustainability

JF - Nature Sustainability

SN - 2398-9629

IS - 6

ER -