Murine pulmonary acinar mechanics during quasi-static inflation using synchrotron refraction-enhanced computed tomography

Toshihiro Sera, Hideo Yokota, Gaku Tanaka, Kentaro Uesugi, Naoto Yagi, Robert C. Schroter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We visualized pulmonary acini in the core regions of the mouse lung in situ using synchrotron refraction-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and evaluated their kinematics during quasi-static inflation. This CT system (with a cube voxel of 2.8 μm) allows excellent visualization of not just the conducting airways, but also the alveolar ducts and sacs, and tracking of the acinar shape and its deformation during inflation. The kinematics of individual alveoli and alveolar clusters with a group of terminal alveoli is influenced not only by the connecting alveolar duct and alveoli, but also by the neighboring structures. Acinar volume was not a linear function of lung volume. The alveolar duct diameter changed dramatically during inflation at low pressures and remained relatively constant above an airway pressure of 8 cmH2O during inflation. The ratio of acinar surface area to acinar volume indicates that acinar distension during low-pressure inflation differed from that during inflation over a higher pressure range; in particular, acinar deformation was accordion-like during low-pressure inflation. These results indicated that the alveoli and duct expand differently as total acinar volume increases and that the alveolar duct may expand predominantly during low-pressure inflation. Our findings suggest that acinar deformation in the core regions of the lung is complex and heterogeneous.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-228
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume115
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 15 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Synchrotrons
Economic Inflation
Mechanics
Tomography
Lung
Pressure
Biomechanical Phenomena

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Murine pulmonary acinar mechanics during quasi-static inflation using synchrotron refraction-enhanced computed tomography. / Sera, Toshihiro; Yokota, Hideo; Tanaka, Gaku; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto; Schroter, Robert C.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 115, No. 2, 15.07.2013, p. 219-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sera, Toshihiro ; Yokota, Hideo ; Tanaka, Gaku ; Uesugi, Kentaro ; Yagi, Naoto ; Schroter, Robert C. / Murine pulmonary acinar mechanics during quasi-static inflation using synchrotron refraction-enhanced computed tomography. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2013 ; Vol. 115, No. 2. pp. 219-228.
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