Mycophenolate mofetil use after unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for prophylaxis and treatment of graft-vs.-host disease in adult patients in Japan

Minako Iida, Takahiro Fukuda, Naoyuki Uchida, Makoto Murata, Nobuyuki Aotsuka, Kentaro Minagawa, Kazuteru Oohashi, Kentaro Fukushima, Tadakazu Kondo, Tetsuya Eto, Toshihiro Miyamoto, Yasuo Morishima, Tokiko Nagamura, Yoshiko Atsuta, Ritsuro Suzuki

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous study of 301 patients who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from related donors demonstrated the efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for prophylaxis and treatment of graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD). In this study, we investigated the safety and efficacy of MMF in 716 adult patients who received unrelated HSCT. The incidences of Grade II-IV and III-IV acute GVHD in the prophylactic administration group were 38.3% and 14.3%, respectively. These rates were not statistically significant when evaluating the MMF dosage and graft source. The incidences of limited and extensive chronic GVHD were 16.6% and 11.1%, respectively. In the therapeutic administration group, 69.1% of the subjective symptoms for both acute and chronic GVHD improved. With respect to the adverse events, 75 infections and 50 cases of diarrhea were observed, and the frequency of these events increased with increasing MMF dose. The overall survival rate was 36.4% after a median follow-up period of three yr. This study shows that MMF is safe and effective for the prevention and treatment of GVHD in patients who have received HSCT from unrelated donors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)980-989
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume28
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

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