Myeloid progenitors protect against invasive aspergillosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Andrew BitMansour, Stacy M. Burns, David Traver, Koichi Akashi, Christopher H. Contag, Irving L. Weissman, Janice M.Y. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Myelotoxic treatments for oncologic diseases are often complicated by neutropenia, which renders patients susceptible to potentially lethal infections. In these studies of murine hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cotransplantation of lineage-restricted progenitors known as common myeloid progenitors (CMP) and granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMP) protects against death following otherwise lethal challenge with either of 2 pathogens associated with neutropenia: Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cotransplantation of CMP/GMP resulted in a significant and rapid increase in the absolute number of myeloid cells in the spleen, most of which were derived from the donor CMP/GMP. Despite persistent peripheral neutropenia, improved survival correlated with the measurable appearance of progenitor-derived myeloid cells in the spleen. A marked reduction or elimination of tissue pathogen load was confirmed by culture and correlated with survival. Localization of infection by P aeruginosa and extent of disease was also assessed by in vivo bioluminescent imaging using a strain of P aeruginosa engineered to constitutively express a bacterial luciferase. Imaging confirmed that transplantation with a graft containing hematopoietic stem cells and CMP/ GMP reduced the bacterial load as early as 18 hours after infection. These results demonstrate that enhanced reconstitution of a tissue myeloid pool offers protection against lethal challenge with serious fungal and bacterial pathogens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4660-4667
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume100
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 15 2002

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Myeloid Progenitor Cells
Pseudomonas Infections
Aspergillosis
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Pathogens
Granulocyte Precursor Cells
Stem cells
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Monocytes
Neutropenia
Bacterial Luciferases
Tissue
Transplantation (surgical)
Imaging techniques
Aspergillus
Grafts
Spleen
Infection
Aspergillus fumigatus
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Myeloid progenitors protect against invasive aspergillosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. / BitMansour, Andrew; Burns, Stacy M.; Traver, David; Akashi, Koichi; Contag, Christopher H.; Weissman, Irving L.; Brown, Janice M.Y.

In: Blood, Vol. 100, No. 13, 15.12.2002, p. 4660-4667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

BitMansour, Andrew ; Burns, Stacy M. ; Traver, David ; Akashi, Koichi ; Contag, Christopher H. ; Weissman, Irving L. ; Brown, Janice M.Y. / Myeloid progenitors protect against invasive aspergillosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In: Blood. 2002 ; Vol. 100, No. 13. pp. 4660-4667.
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