Nanoscale organic electroluminescence from tunnel junctions

X. L. Guo, Z. C. Dong, A. S. Trifonov, K. Miki, Y. Wakayama, D. Fujita, K. Kimura, Shiyoshi Yokoyama, S. Mashiko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanoscale organic electroluminescence was induced by positioning a sharp tungsten tip on the surface of a free-base porphyrin (H2TBPP) monolayer on the top of PtTBP porphyrin (PtTBPP) multilayers on a Cu(100) substrate in an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) system. The well-defined molecular fluorescence spectra are perfectly matched with the conventional photoluminescence spectrum from bulk H2TBPP molecules. The nanoscale PtTBPP multilayers do not fluoresce; rather, they act as spacers to enhance the decoupling of the electronic state of the H2TBPP monolayer from the Cu surface. The electronic property of molecules and the energy-level alignment of molecules with respect to the Fermi levels of electrodes are probably quite critical for observing STM-induced molecular fluorescence from molecular layers with a similar thickness. The molecule in proximity to the tip apex of a scanning tunneling microscope is locally excited by the hot electron injection mechanism, followed by radiative decay via Franck-Condon transitions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalPhysical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Volume70
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tunnel junctions
Electroluminescence
tunnel junctions
electroluminescence
Porphyrins
porphyrins
Molecules
Microscopes
microscopes
Scanning
scanning
molecules
Monolayers
Multilayers
Fluorescence
fluorescence
Tungsten
Electron injection
Hot electrons
Electronic states

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Guo, X. L., Dong, Z. C., Trifonov, A. S., Miki, K., Wakayama, Y., Fujita, D., ... Mashiko, S. (2004). Nanoscale organic electroluminescence from tunnel junctions. Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, 70(23), 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.70.233204

Nanoscale organic electroluminescence from tunnel junctions. / Guo, X. L.; Dong, Z. C.; Trifonov, A. S.; Miki, K.; Wakayama, Y.; Fujita, D.; Kimura, K.; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi; Mashiko, S.

In: Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Vol. 70, No. 23, 01.12.2004, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guo, XL, Dong, ZC, Trifonov, AS, Miki, K, Wakayama, Y, Fujita, D, Kimura, K, Yokoyama, S & Mashiko, S 2004, 'Nanoscale organic electroluminescence from tunnel junctions', Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol. 70, no. 23, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.70.233204
Guo, X. L. ; Dong, Z. C. ; Trifonov, A. S. ; Miki, K. ; Wakayama, Y. ; Fujita, D. ; Kimura, K. ; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi ; Mashiko, S. / Nanoscale organic electroluminescence from tunnel junctions. In: Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics. 2004 ; Vol. 70, No. 23. pp. 1-4.
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