Natural variation in stomatal responses to environmental changes among Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

Sho Takahashi, Keina Monda, Juntaro Negi, Fumitaka Konishi, Shinobu Ishikawa, Mimi Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Nobuharu Goto, Koh Iba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stomata are small pores surrounded by guard cells that regulate gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere. Guard cells integrate multiple environmental signals and control the aperture width to ensure appropriate stomatal function for plant survival. Leaf temperature can be used as an indirect indicator of stomatal conductance to environmental signals. In this study, leaf thermal imaging of 374 Arabidopsis ecotypes was performed to assess their stomatal responses to changes in environmental CO2 concentrations. We identified three ecotypes, Köln (Kl-4), Gabelstein (Ga-0), and Chisdra (Chi-1), that have particularly low responsiveness to changes in CO2 concentrations. We next investigated stomatal responses to other environmental signals in these selected ecotypes, with Col-0 as the reference. The stomatal responses to light were also reduced in the three selected ecotypes when compared with Col-0. In contrast, their stomatal responses to changes in humidity were similar to those of Col-0. Of note, the responses to abscisic acid, a plant hormone involved in the adaptation of plants to reduced water availability, were not entirely consistent with the responses to humidity. This study demonstrates that the stomatal responses to CO2 and light share closely associated signaling mechanisms that are not generally correlated with humidity signaling pathways in these ecotypes. The results might reflect differences between ecotypes in intrinsic response mechanisms to environmental signals.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0117449
JournalPloS one
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 23 2015

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Ecotype
ecotypes
Arabidopsis
Atmospheric humidity
Arabidopsis thaliana
Humidity
humidity
Abscisic Acid
Plant Growth Regulators
guard cells
Infrared imaging
Gases
Availability
Light
plant adaptation
Water
Atmosphere
stomata
plant hormones
gas exchange

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Natural variation in stomatal responses to environmental changes among Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes. / Takahashi, Sho; Monda, Keina; Negi, Juntaro; Konishi, Fumitaka; Ishikawa, Shinobu; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Goto, Nobuharu; Iba, Koh.

In: PloS one, Vol. 10, No. 2, e0117449, 23.02.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takahashi, Sho ; Monda, Keina ; Negi, Juntaro ; Konishi, Fumitaka ; Ishikawa, Shinobu ; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi ; Goto, Nobuharu ; Iba, Koh. / Natural variation in stomatal responses to environmental changes among Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes. In: PloS one. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 2.
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