Negative feedback for DARS2-Fis complex by ATP-DnaA supports the cell cycle-coordinated regulation for chromosome replication

Kenya Miyoshi, Yuka Tatsumoto, Shogo Ozaki, Tsutomu Katayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Escherichia coli, the replication initiator DnaA oscillates between an ATP- and an ADP-bound state in a cell cycle-dependent manner, supporting regulation for chromosome replication. ATP-DnaA cooperatively assembles on the replication origin using clusters of low-affinity DnaA-binding sites. After initiation, DnaA-bound ATP is hydrolyzed, producing initiation-inactive ADP-DnaA. For the next round of initiation, ADP-DnaA binds to the chromosomal locus DARS2, which promotes the release of ADP, yielding the apo-DnaA to regain the initiation activity through ATP binding. This DnaA reactivation by DARS2 depends on site-specific binding of IHF (integration host factor) and Fis proteins and IHF binding to DARS2 occurs specifically during pre-initiation. Here, we reveal that Fis binds to an essential region in DARS2 specifically during pre-initiation. Further analyses demonstrate that ATP-DnaA, but not ADP-DnaA, oligomerizes on a cluster of low-affinity DnaA-binding sites overlapping the Fis-binding region, which competitively inhibits Fis binding and hence the DARS2 activity. DiaA (DnaA initiator-associating protein) stimulating ATP-DnaA assembly enhances the dissociation of Fis. These observations lead to a negative feedback model where the activity of DARS2 is repressed around the time of initiation by the elevated ATP-DnaA level and is stimulated following initiation when the ATP-DnaA level is reduced.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12820-12835
Number of pages16
JournalNucleic acids research
Volume49
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 16 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics

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