Neural correlates of fear-induced sympathetic response associated with the peripheral temperature change rate

Kazufumi Yoshihara, Hiroki C. Tanabe, Hiroaki Kawamichi, Takahiko Koike, Mika Yamazaki, Nobuyuki Sudo, Norihiro Sadato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Activation of the sympathetic nervous system is essential for coping with environmental stressors such as fearful stimuli. Recent human imaging studies demonstrated that activity in some cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and anterior insula cortex (aIC), is related to sympathetic activity. However, little is known about the functional brain connectivity related to sympathetic response to fearful stimuli. The participants were 32 healthy, right-handed volunteers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine brain activity when watching horror and control movies. Fingertip temperature was taken during the scanning as a measure of sympathetic response. The movies were watched a second time, and the degree of fear (9-point Likert-type scale) was evaluated every three seconds. The brain activity of the ACC, bilateral aIC, and bilateral anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC) was correlated with the change rate of fingertip temperature, with or without fearful stimuli. Functional connectivity analysis revealed significantly greater positive functional connectivity between the amygdala and the ACC and between the amygdala and the aIC when watching the horror movie than when watching the control movie. Whole-brain psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed that the functional connectivity between the left amygdala and the ACC was modulated according to the fear rating. Our results indicate that the increased functional connectivity between the left amygdala and the ACC represents a sympathetic response to fearful stimuli.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)522-531
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroImage
Volume134
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

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Gyrus Cinguli
Fear
Motion Pictures
Amygdala
Temperature
Brain
Sympathetic Nervous System
Prefrontal Cortex
Volunteers
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Neural correlates of fear-induced sympathetic response associated with the peripheral temperature change rate. / Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Koike, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Mika; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Sadato, Norihiro.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 134, 01.07.2016, p. 522-531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoshihara, Kazufumi ; Tanabe, Hiroki C. ; Kawamichi, Hiroaki ; Koike, Takahiko ; Yamazaki, Mika ; Sudo, Nobuyuki ; Sadato, Norihiro. / Neural correlates of fear-induced sympathetic response associated with the peripheral temperature change rate. In: NeuroImage. 2016 ; Vol. 134. pp. 522-531.
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