Neural networks for mindfulness and emotion suppression

Hiroki Murakami, Ruri Katsunuma, Kentaro Oba, Yuri Terasawa, Yuki motomura, Kazuo Mishima, Yoshiya Moriguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on "here and now" experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one's own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0128005
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 17 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Mindfulness
emotions
neural networks
Emotions
Modulation
Neural networks
amygdala
Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Cognitive Therapy
magnetic resonance imaging
Healthy Volunteers
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Murakami, H., Katsunuma, R., Oba, K., Terasawa, Y., motomura, Y., Mishima, K., & Moriguchi, Y. (2015). Neural networks for mindfulness and emotion suppression. PLoS One, 10(6), [e0128005]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0128005

Neural networks for mindfulness and emotion suppression. / Murakami, Hiroki; Katsunuma, Ruri; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; motomura, Yuki; Mishima, Kazuo; Moriguchi, Yoshiya.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 6, e0128005, 17.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murakami, H, Katsunuma, R, Oba, K, Terasawa, Y, motomura, Y, Mishima, K & Moriguchi, Y 2015, 'Neural networks for mindfulness and emotion suppression', PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 6, e0128005. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0128005
Murakami H, Katsunuma R, Oba K, Terasawa Y, motomura Y, Mishima K et al. Neural networks for mindfulness and emotion suppression. PLoS One. 2015 Jun 17;10(6). e0128005. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0128005
Murakami, Hiroki ; Katsunuma, Ruri ; Oba, Kentaro ; Terasawa, Yuri ; motomura, Yuki ; Mishima, Kazuo ; Moriguchi, Yoshiya. / Neural networks for mindfulness and emotion suppression. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 6.
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