Neural substrates of shared attention as social memory

A hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging study

Takahiko Koike, Hiroki C. Tanabe, Shuntaro Okazaki, Eri Nakagawa, Akihiro T. Sasaki, Koji Shimada, Sho K. Sugawara, Haruka K. Takahashi, Kazufumi Yoshihara, Jorge Bosch-Bayard, Norihiro Sadato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During a dyadic social interaction, two individuals can share visual attention through gaze, directed to each other (mutual gaze) or to a third person or an object (joint attention). Shared attention is fundamental to dyadic face-to-face interaction, but how attention is shared, retained, and neutrally represented in a pair-specific manner has not been well studied. Here, we conducted a two-day hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging study in which pairs of participants performed a real-time mutual gaze task followed by a joint attention task on the first day, and mutual gaze tasks several days later. The joint attention task enhanced eye-blink synchronization, which is believed to be a behavioral index of shared attention. When the same participant pairs underwent mutual gaze without joint attention on the second day, enhanced eye-blink synchronization persisted, and this was positively correlated with inter-individual neural synchronization within the right inferior frontal gyrus. Neural synchronization was also positively correlated with enhanced eye-blink synchronization during the previous joint attention task session. Consistent with the Hebbian association hypothesis, the right inferior frontal gyrus had been activated both by initiating and responding to joint attention. These results indicate that shared attention is represented and retained by pair-specific neural synchronization that cannot be reduced to the individual level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-412
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroImage
Volume125
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 15 2016

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Prefrontal Cortex
Interpersonal Relations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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Koike, T., Tanabe, H. C., Okazaki, S., Nakagawa, E., Sasaki, A. T., Shimada, K., ... Sadato, N. (2016). Neural substrates of shared attention as social memory: A hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging study. NeuroImage, 125, 401-412. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.09.076

Neural substrates of shared attention as social memory : A hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging study. / Koike, Takahiko; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Okazaki, Shuntaro; Nakagawa, Eri; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Shimada, Koji; Sugawara, Sho K.; Takahashi, Haruka K.; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Bosch-Bayard, Jorge; Sadato, Norihiro.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 125, 15.01.2016, p. 401-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koike, T, Tanabe, HC, Okazaki, S, Nakagawa, E, Sasaki, AT, Shimada, K, Sugawara, SK, Takahashi, HK, Yoshihara, K, Bosch-Bayard, J & Sadato, N 2016, 'Neural substrates of shared attention as social memory: A hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging study', NeuroImage, vol. 125, pp. 401-412. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.09.076
Koike, Takahiko ; Tanabe, Hiroki C. ; Okazaki, Shuntaro ; Nakagawa, Eri ; Sasaki, Akihiro T. ; Shimada, Koji ; Sugawara, Sho K. ; Takahashi, Haruka K. ; Yoshihara, Kazufumi ; Bosch-Bayard, Jorge ; Sadato, Norihiro. / Neural substrates of shared attention as social memory : A hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging study. In: NeuroImage. 2016 ; Vol. 125. pp. 401-412.
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