New algorithm for oscillometric noninvasive automatic arterial pressure measurement in patients with atrial fibrillation

Masaru Sugimachi, Kenji Sunagawa, Hirotsugu Okamoto, Sumio Hoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oscillometric noninvasive arterial pressure monitoring devices frequently fail to measure pressure precisely in patients with arrhythmia, such as atrial fibrillation, because beat-by-beat changes in pulse pressure and mean pressure level distort the relation between cuff pressure and oscillometric wave amplitude. To overcome this problem, we developed a new algorithm for oscillometric measurement in which oscillometric wave amplitude is corrected according to changes in pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure level. In 7 patients with atrial fibrillation, we compared systolic pressure thus estimated with that simultaneously measured invasively in the radial artery and averaged during oscillometric measurement. Correction based on invasively obtained beat-by-beat pulse pressure and mean pressure level decreased the ratio of unmeasurable cases from 11 to 4%. Correction based on plethysmographically estimated pulse pressure decreased unmeasurable cases to 6% (P<0.01). Standard error of systolic pressure estimates was 6.44±1.83, 4.10±0.85, and 4.75±1.26 mmHg with no, invasive, and plethysmographical correction in this order (P<0.01). We conclude that oscillometric wave amplitude correction based on beat-by-beat pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure level lessened the number of unmeasurable cases and improved measurement precision in patients with atrial fibrillation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)784-790
Number of pages7
JournalJapanese Journal of Anesthesiology
Volume51
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Aug 12 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'New algorithm for oscillometric noninvasive automatic arterial pressure measurement in patients with atrial fibrillation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this