New pathologic stratification of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma: Predicting prognosis after living-donor liver transplantation

Tomohiro Iguchi, Ken Shirabe, Shinichi Aishima, Huanlin Wang, Nobuhiro Fujita, Mizuki Ninomiya, Yo Ichi Yamashita, Toru Ikegami, Hideaki Uchiyama, Tomoharu Yoshizumi, Yoshinao Oda, Yoshihiko Maehara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Vascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high incidence of recurrence after liver transplantation. Patients with microvascular invasion (MVI) show a high tumor grade; however, some show a good prognosis. This retrospective study aimed to investigate whether the degree of MVI affects prognosis after living-donor liver transplantation. Methods. A total of 142 patients with HCC who had undergone living-donor liver transplantation were histologically evaluated about the number of invaded vessels and the maximum number of invading carcinoma cells. Patients with MVI were classified into two subgroups: high MVI group (n = 38), which showed more than 50 carcinoma cells in the vessels, with multiple invaded vessels; and low MVI group (n = 17), which showed MVI, but not high MVI. Results. Analysis of recurrence-free survival showed that high MVI group had significantly poorer outcomes than the other groups (P < 0.001). High MVI group had significantly higher α-fetoprotein levels, des-γ-carboxy prothrombin levels, number of tumors, a larger tumor size, and a higher percentage of poorly differentiated HCC than non-MVI group. High MVI was an independent prognostic factor for recurrence-free survival (P = 0.030). Among patients exceeding the Milan criteria (n = 61), high MVI group had significantly poorer outcomes than the other groups for recurrence-free survival (P = 0.003). Patients in high MVI group had significantly higher des-γ-carboxy prothrombin levels and a larger tumor size than non-MVI group. High MVI was an independent prognostic factor for recurrence-free survival (P = 0.014). Conclusion. In living-donor liver transplantation for HCC, high MVI is a novel pathologic marker for predicting prognosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1236-1242
Number of pages7
JournalTransplantation
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 6 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'New pathologic stratification of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma: Predicting prognosis after living-donor liver transplantation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Iguchi, T., Shirabe, K., Aishima, S., Wang, H., Fujita, N., Ninomiya, M., Yamashita, Y. I., Ikegami, T., Uchiyama, H., Yoshizumi, T., Oda, Y., & Maehara, Y. (2015). New pathologic stratification of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma: Predicting prognosis after living-donor liver transplantation. Transplantation, 99(6), 1236-1242. https://doi.org/10.1097/TP.0000000000000489