Night-time leaf wetting process and its effect on the morning humidity gradient as a driving force of transpirational water loss in a semi-arid cornfield

Daisuke Yasutake, Makito Mori, Kitano Masaharu, Ryosuke Nomiyama, Yuta Miyoshi, Daisuke Hisaeda, Hiroyui Cho, Kenta Tagawa, Yueru Wu, Weizhen Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Night-time leaf wetting process was analyzed in relation to micrometeorological conditions in a semi-arid cornfield and its effect was examined in the following morning with reference to the leaf-to-air humidity gradient which is a driving force in transpiration. Leaf wetness occurred due to dew formation under clear and calm night conditions which decreased canopy surface temperature to the air dew-point temperature. The amount of dew on leaves collected around sunrise (06:00) was 26.4-104.3 g m-2 · leaf area, which corresponded to 0.07-0.27 mm water. Leaf wetness remained until around 10:00 and significantly decreased leaf temperature. As a result, the leaf-to-air humidity gradient also decreased in the wetted leaf compared to the non-wetted leaf. These results suggest that night-time leaf wetting induces lower transpiration rate and may play a role in diminishing plant water stress due to excess transpirational water loss in the morning in semi-arid environments. Further studies are needed in order to demonstrate this possible effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1485-1489
Number of pages5
JournalBiologia (Poland)
Volume70
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2015

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Humidity
wetting
Wetting
humidity
Atmospheric humidity
Transpiration
Air
Temperature
Water
leaves
water
Dehydration
dew
air
transpiration
dewpoint
effect
loss
dry environmental conditions
dew point

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Night-time leaf wetting process and its effect on the morning humidity gradient as a driving force of transpirational water loss in a semi-arid cornfield. / Yasutake, Daisuke; Mori, Makito; Masaharu, Kitano; Nomiyama, Ryosuke; Miyoshi, Yuta; Hisaeda, Daisuke; Cho, Hiroyui; Tagawa, Kenta; Wu, Yueru; Wang, Weizhen.

In: Biologia (Poland), Vol. 70, No. 11, 01.11.2015, p. 1485-1489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yasutake, Daisuke ; Mori, Makito ; Masaharu, Kitano ; Nomiyama, Ryosuke ; Miyoshi, Yuta ; Hisaeda, Daisuke ; Cho, Hiroyui ; Tagawa, Kenta ; Wu, Yueru ; Wang, Weizhen. / Night-time leaf wetting process and its effect on the morning humidity gradient as a driving force of transpirational water loss in a semi-arid cornfield. In: Biologia (Poland). 2015 ; Vol. 70, No. 11. pp. 1485-1489.
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