Nitric oxide derived from sympathetic nerves regulates airway responsiveness to histamine in guinea pigs

Koichiro Matsumoto, Hisamichi Aizawa, Shohei Takata, Hiromasa Inoue, Naotsugu Takahashi, Nobuyuki Kara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO), which can be derived from the nervous system or the epithelium of the airway, may modulate airway responsiveness. We investigated how NO derived from the airway nervous system would affect the airway responsiveness to histamine and acetylcholine in mechanically ventilated guinea pigs. An NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L- NAME) (1 mmol/kg ip) significantly enhanced airway responsiveness to histamine but not to acetylcholine. Its enantiomer D-NAME (1 mmol/kg ip), in contrast, had no effect. The L-NAME-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was still observed in animals pretreated with propranolol (1 mg/kg iv) and atropine (1 mg/kg iv). Pretreatment with the ganglionic blocker hexamethonium (2 mg/kg iv) completely abolished enhancing effect of L-NAME on airway responsiveness. Bilateral cervical vagotemy did not alter the L-NAME-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas sympathetic stellatectomy completely abolished it. Results suggest that NO that was presumably derived from the sympathetic nervous system regulates airway responsiveness to histamine in guinea pigs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1432-1437
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume83
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 1997

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NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester
Histamine
Nitric Oxide
Guinea Pigs
Nervous System
Acetylcholine
Ganglionic Blockers
Hexamethonium
Sympathetic Nervous System
Atropine
Propranolol
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Epithelium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Nitric oxide derived from sympathetic nerves regulates airway responsiveness to histamine in guinea pigs. / Matsumoto, Koichiro; Aizawa, Hisamichi; Takata, Shohei; Inoue, Hiromasa; Takahashi, Naotsugu; Kara, Nobuyuki.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 83, No. 5, 01.11.1997, p. 1432-1437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsumoto, K, Aizawa, H, Takata, S, Inoue, H, Takahashi, N & Kara, N 1997, 'Nitric oxide derived from sympathetic nerves regulates airway responsiveness to histamine in guinea pigs', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 83, no. 5, pp. 1432-1437.
Matsumoto, Koichiro ; Aizawa, Hisamichi ; Takata, Shohei ; Inoue, Hiromasa ; Takahashi, Naotsugu ; Kara, Nobuyuki. / Nitric oxide derived from sympathetic nerves regulates airway responsiveness to histamine in guinea pigs. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1997 ; Vol. 83, No. 5. pp. 1432-1437.
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