Noninvasive transcutaneous bionic baroreflex system prevents severe orthostatic hypotension in patients with spinal cord injury.

Masayoshi Yoshida, Yoshinori Murayama, Akiko Chishaki, Kenji Sunagawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Central baroreflex failure in patients with spinal cord injury results in serious orthostatic hypotension. We examined if transcutaneous electrical stimulation regulates arterial pressure in those patients. We identified skin regions capable of increasing arterial pressure and determined respective transfer function. Using the transfer function, we designed the feedback regulator (i.e., bionic baroreflex system) to control arterial pressure. Orthostatic stress decreased arterial pressure profoundly. Activation of bionic regulator restored and maintained arterial pressure at pre-specified levels. We conclude that the transcutaneous bionic system is noninvasive and capable of stabilizing arterial pressure in patients with spinal cord injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1985-1987
Number of pages3
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bionics
Orthostatic Hypotension
Baroreflex
Spinal Cord Injuries
Arterial Pressure
Transfer functions
Pressure control
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Skin
Chemical activation
Feedback

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

@article{6668b17fe5584cadbe934dcca8b68720,
title = "Noninvasive transcutaneous bionic baroreflex system prevents severe orthostatic hypotension in patients with spinal cord injury.",
abstract = "Central baroreflex failure in patients with spinal cord injury results in serious orthostatic hypotension. We examined if transcutaneous electrical stimulation regulates arterial pressure in those patients. We identified skin regions capable of increasing arterial pressure and determined respective transfer function. Using the transfer function, we designed the feedback regulator (i.e., bionic baroreflex system) to control arterial pressure. Orthostatic stress decreased arterial pressure profoundly. Activation of bionic regulator restored and maintained arterial pressure at pre-specified levels. We conclude that the transcutaneous bionic system is noninvasive and capable of stabilizing arterial pressure in patients with spinal cord injury.",
author = "Masayoshi Yoshida and Yoshinori Murayama and Akiko Chishaki and Kenji Sunagawa",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
pages = "1985--1987",
journal = "Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings",
issn = "1557-170X",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Noninvasive transcutaneous bionic baroreflex system prevents severe orthostatic hypotension in patients with spinal cord injury.

AU - Yoshida, Masayoshi

AU - Murayama, Yoshinori

AU - Chishaki, Akiko

AU - Sunagawa, Kenji

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Central baroreflex failure in patients with spinal cord injury results in serious orthostatic hypotension. We examined if transcutaneous electrical stimulation regulates arterial pressure in those patients. We identified skin regions capable of increasing arterial pressure and determined respective transfer function. Using the transfer function, we designed the feedback regulator (i.e., bionic baroreflex system) to control arterial pressure. Orthostatic stress decreased arterial pressure profoundly. Activation of bionic regulator restored and maintained arterial pressure at pre-specified levels. We conclude that the transcutaneous bionic system is noninvasive and capable of stabilizing arterial pressure in patients with spinal cord injury.

AB - Central baroreflex failure in patients with spinal cord injury results in serious orthostatic hypotension. We examined if transcutaneous electrical stimulation regulates arterial pressure in those patients. We identified skin regions capable of increasing arterial pressure and determined respective transfer function. Using the transfer function, we designed the feedback regulator (i.e., bionic baroreflex system) to control arterial pressure. Orthostatic stress decreased arterial pressure profoundly. Activation of bionic regulator restored and maintained arterial pressure at pre-specified levels. We conclude that the transcutaneous bionic system is noninvasive and capable of stabilizing arterial pressure in patients with spinal cord injury.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84903855372&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84903855372&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 19163081

SP - 1985

EP - 1987

JO - Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings

JF - Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings

SN - 1557-170X

ER -