Obligate bacterial mutualists evolving from environmental bacteria in natural insect populations

Takahiro Hosokawa, Yoshiko Ishii, Naruo Nikoh, Manabu Fujie, Nori Satoh, Takema Fukatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diverse organisms are associated with obligate microbial mutualists. How such essential symbionts have originated from free-living ancestors is of evolutionary interest. Here we report that, in natural populations of the stinkbug Plautia stali, obligate bacterial mutualists are evolving from environmental bacteria. Of six distinct bacterial lineages associated with insect populations, two are uncultivable with reduced genomes, four are cultivable with non-reduced genomes, one uncultivable symbiont is fixed in temperate populations, and the other uncultivable symbiont coexists with four cultivable symbionts in subtropical populations. Symbiont elimination resulted in host mortality for all symbionts, while re-infection with any of the symbionts restored normal host growth, indicating that all the symbionts are indispensable and almost equivalent functionally. Some aseptic newborns incubated with environmental soils acquired the cultivable symbionts and normal growth was restored, identifying them as environmental Pantoea spp. Our finding uncovers an evolutionary transition from a free-living lifestyle to obligate mutualism that is currently ongoing in nature.

Original languageEnglish
Article number15011
JournalNature Microbiology
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 11 2016

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Insects
Bacteria
Population
Pantoea
Genome
Symbiosis
Growth
Life Style
Soil
Newborn Infant
Mortality
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Obligate bacterial mutualists evolving from environmental bacteria in natural insect populations. / Hosokawa, Takahiro; Ishii, Yoshiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Fujie, Manabu; Satoh, Nori; Fukatsu, Takema.

In: Nature Microbiology, Vol. 1, No. 1, 15011, 11.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hosokawa, Takahiro ; Ishii, Yoshiko ; Nikoh, Naruo ; Fujie, Manabu ; Satoh, Nori ; Fukatsu, Takema. / Obligate bacterial mutualists evolving from environmental bacteria in natural insect populations. In: Nature Microbiology. 2016 ; Vol. 1, No. 1.
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