On optimality of human arm movements

Zhiwei Luo, Mikhail Svinin, Ken Ohta, Tadashi Odashima, Shigeyuki Hosoe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are many tasks that requires us to interact with physical environment, such as opening a door, turning a steering wheel, rotating a coffee mill, et al. In these tasks, the arm is usually constrained to the environmental geometry. Although there are infinite possibilities for human subject to select his/her arm trajectories as well as interacting forces when performing the tasks, experiments of human constrained motion however show that there clearly exist some characteristics inherent in all measurement data. Specifically, in this research, it is shown that, when human rotating a crank, he/she optimizes the criterion that minimizes the change of both the end-effector force as well as the muscle forces. This numerical result is strongly supported by human experiments data. Since this criterion is different from the minimum torque change criterion proposed to evaluate human reaching movement in free motion space, it is then suggested that human may use different optimal strategies with respect to different task requirements as well as environmental conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2004 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE ROBIO 2004
Pages256-261
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2004
EventProceedings - 2004 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE ROBIO 2004 - Shenyang, China
Duration: Aug 22 2004Aug 26 2004

Publication series

NameProceedings - 2004 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE ROBIO 2004

Other

OtherProceedings - 2004 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE ROBIO 2004
CountryChina
CityShenyang
Period8/22/048/26/04

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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