Optimal number of regulatory T cells

Koichi Saeki, Yoh Iwasa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The adaptive immune system of a vertebrate may attack its own body, causing autoimmune diseases. Regulatory T cells suppress the activity of the autoreactive effector T cells, but they also interrupt normal immune reactions against foreign antigens. In this paper, we discuss the optimal number of regulatory T cells that should be produced. We make the assumptions that some self-reactive immature T cells may fail to interact with their target antigens during the limited training period and later become effector T cells causing autoimmunity, and that regulatory T cells exist that recognize self-antigens. When a regulatory T cell is stimulated by its target self-antigen on an antigen-presenting cell (APC), it stays there and suppresses the activation of other naive T cells on the same APC. Analysis of the benefit and the harm of having regulatory T cells suggests that the optimal number of regulatory T cells depends on the number of self-antigens, the severity of the autoimmunity, the abundance of pathogenic foreign antigens, and the spatial distribution of self-antigens in the body. For multiple types of self-antigen, we discuss the optimal number of regulatory T cells when the self-antigens are localized in different parts of the body and when they are co-localized. We also examine the separate regulation of the abundances of regulatory T cells for different self-antigens, comparing it with the situation in which they are constrained to be equal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-218
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume263
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2010

Fingerprint

T-cells
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Autoantigens
Antigens
T-lymphocytes
antigens
T-Lymphocytes
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Autoimmunity
autoimmunity
antigen-presenting cells
Human Body
Antigen-antibody reactions
Autoimmune Diseases
Vertebrates
Immune System
Target
Immune system
autoimmune diseases
Cell

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Optimal number of regulatory T cells. / Saeki, Koichi; Iwasa, Yoh.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 263, No. 2, 01.03.2010, p. 210-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saeki, Koichi ; Iwasa, Yoh. / Optimal number of regulatory T cells. In: Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2010 ; Vol. 263, No. 2. pp. 210-218.
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