Orally administered L-ornithine elevates brain L-ornithine levels and has an anxiolytic-like effect in mice

Koji Kurata, Mao Nagasawa, Shozo Tomonaga, Mami Aoki, Koji Morishita, D. Michael Denbow, Mitsuhiro Furuse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intracerebroventricular injection of L-ornithine has demonstrated sedative and hypnotic effects in neonatal chicks exposed to acute stressful conditions. However, whether orally administered L-ornithine can reduce acute mental stress remains to be defined. To clarify the nutritional importance of L-ornithine in controlling the stress response, in Experiment 1 we first investigated whether orally administered L-ornithine can be transported into the brain of mice. Mice were orally administered L-ornithine (3 mmol/water 10 ml/kg, per os). L-Ornithine levels were significantly elevated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus at 30 and 60 minutes post-administration. In Experiment 2, the effect of orally administered L-ornithine (0, 0.1875, 0.75 and 3 mmol/water 10 ml/kg, per os) on anxiety-like behavior in mice exposed to the elevated plus-maze test was examined at 30 minutes post-administration. There was a significant increase in the percentage of time spent and entries in the open arms in the group receiving 0.75 mmol of L-ornithine compared to the control group. Furthermore, locomotion activity in a novel environment was not significantly changed between the control group and 0.75 mmol of L-ornithine group in Experiment 3. Therefore, it appears that orally administrated L-ornithine is bioavailable to the rodent brain and reduces anxiety-like behavior as demonstrated by the elevated plus-maze test.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-248
Number of pages6
JournalNutritional Neuroscience
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2011

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Ornithine
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Brain
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Anxiety
Control Groups
Water
Locomotion
Cerebral Cortex
Rodentia
Hippocampus
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Orally administered L-ornithine elevates brain L-ornithine levels and has an anxiolytic-like effect in mice. / Kurata, Koji; Nagasawa, Mao; Tomonaga, Shozo; Aoki, Mami; Morishita, Koji; Denbow, D. Michael; Furuse, Mitsuhiro.

In: Nutritional Neuroscience, Vol. 14, No. 6, 01.11.2011, p. 243-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurata, Koji ; Nagasawa, Mao ; Tomonaga, Shozo ; Aoki, Mami ; Morishita, Koji ; Denbow, D. Michael ; Furuse, Mitsuhiro. / Orally administered L-ornithine elevates brain L-ornithine levels and has an anxiolytic-like effect in mice. In: Nutritional Neuroscience. 2011 ; Vol. 14, No. 6. pp. 243-248.
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