Orbital evolution of cloud particles from explosions of geosynchronous objects

Toshiya Hanada, Tetsuo Yasaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current orbital debris search strategies for telescopes observing in geosynchronous Earth orbit are designed around the known orbital distributions of cataloged objects. However, the majority of cataloged objects are believed to be intact spacecraft and rocket bodies, not the debris particles the searches are intended to locate. If there have been breakups in geosynchronous Earth orbit, the explosions may have put the debris into orbits that are significantly different from those in the catalog. Consequently, observation plans optimized for the catalog population may not be optimized for any unseen debris populations. Some hypothetical cases and a real near-synchronous U.S. Titan IIIC transtage explosion will be presented to demonstrate this effect. Perturbing accelerations to be considered for orbital evolution are the nonspherical part of the Earth's gravitational attraction and gravitational attractions due to the sun and moon. Solar radiation pressure effects are omitted in this analysis, not because they are unimportant for this type of analysis, but to concentrate on the primary orbit perturbations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1070-1076
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Spacecraft and Rockets
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2005

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debris
Debris
Explosions
explosions
explosion
Orbits
geosynchronous orbits
orbitals
Earth orbits
Earth (planet)
attraction
catalogs
pressure effect
orbit perturbation
Titan
Moon
Pressure effects
solar radiation
radiation pressure
natural satellites

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Orbital evolution of cloud particles from explosions of geosynchronous objects. / Hanada, Toshiya; Yasaka, Tetsuo.

In: Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, Vol. 42, No. 6, 01.11.2005, p. 1070-1076.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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