Origin of carbon and essential fatty acids in higher trophic level fish in headwater stream food webs

Megumu Fujibayashi, Yoshie Miura, Reina Suganuma, Shinji Takahashi, Takashi Sakamaki, Naoyuki Miyata, So Kazama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary carbon sources in headwater stream food webs are divided into allochthonous and autochthonous organic matters. We hypothesized that: 1) the dietary allochthonous contribution for fish in headwater stream food webs positively relate with canopy cover; and 2) essential fatty acids originate from autochthonous organic matter regardless of canopy covers, because essential fatty acids, such as 20:5ω3 and 22:6ω3, are normally absent in allochthonous organic matters. We investigated predatory fish Salvelinus leucomaenis stomach contents in four headwater stream systems, which are located in subarctic region in northern Japan. In addition, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios, fatty acid profile, and stable carbon isotope ratios of essential fatty acids were analyzed. Bulk stable carbon analysis showed the major contribution of autochthonous sources to assimilated carbon in S. leucomaenis. Surface baits in the stomach had intermediate stable carbon isotope ratios between autochthonous and allochthonous organic matter, indicating aquatic carbon was partly assimilated by surface baits. Stable carbon isotope ratios of essential fatty acids showed a positive relationship between autochthonous sources and S. leucomaenis across four study sites. This study demonstrated that the main supplier of dietary carbon and essential fatty acids was autochthonous organic matter even in headwater stream ecosystems under high canopy cover.

Original languageEnglish
Article number487
JournalBiomolecules
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

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Essential Fatty Acids
Food Chain
Carbon Isotopes
Biological materials
Fish
Fishes
Carbon
Nitrogen Isotopes
Gastrointestinal Contents
Trout
Ecosystems
Ecosystem
Stomach
Japan
Fatty Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

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Origin of carbon and essential fatty acids in higher trophic level fish in headwater stream food webs. / Fujibayashi, Megumu; Miura, Yoshie; Suganuma, Reina; Takahashi, Shinji; Sakamaki, Takashi; Miyata, Naoyuki; Kazama, So.

In: Biomolecules, Vol. 9, No. 9, 487, 09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fujibayashi, Megumu ; Miura, Yoshie ; Suganuma, Reina ; Takahashi, Shinji ; Sakamaki, Takashi ; Miyata, Naoyuki ; Kazama, So. / Origin of carbon and essential fatty acids in higher trophic level fish in headwater stream food webs. In: Biomolecules. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 9.
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