Outdoor measurements of relationship between canopy flow and wall pressure distributions of a block within urban-like block array

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research on indoor ventilation is mainly conducted utilizing wind-tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulations under controlled flow conditions. However, with these techniques, the effects of the actual urban boundary-layer flow with variable wind directions and turbulence on the ventilation performance of a building surrounded by various buildings remain unresolved. Therefore, we conducted outdoor experiments at the Comprehensive Outdoor Scale Model experiment site to evaluate the mutual relationships between wall pressure of a building within a square array, in which cubical blocks are aligned in same spanwise position in a row, and atmospheric urban boundary-layer flow. The dataset consisting of the simultaneous measurements of the wall pressure acting on a target block and the air flow around it was analyzed statistically. The results demonstrate that the distributions of wind pressure coefficient significantly change with the approaching wind direction, while similar cavity flow patterns such as the downward flow at windward wall and the upward flow at leeward wall are observed regardless of the wind direction. Additionally, the pressure coefficient is more sensitive to the approaching wind direction at the side-edge than at the center of the block surface. Moreover, the temporal and spatial distributions of wall pressure are highly correlated with the fluctuating flow above the canopy rather than the turbulence generated within the canopy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106881
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume176
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Building and Construction

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