p32 protein, a splicing factor 2-associated protein, is localized in mitochondrial matrix and is functionally important in maintaining oxidative phosphorylation

Tsuyoshi Muta, Dongchon Kang, Shigetaka Kitajima, Toshiyuki Fujiwara, Naotaka Hamasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

154 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human p32, originally cloned as a splicing factor 2-associated protein, has been reported to interact with a variety of molecules including human immunodeficiency virus Tat and complement 1q (C1q). p32 protein is supposed to be in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane for the association with human immunodeficiency virus Tat and C1q, respectively. None of the interactions, however, is proven to have a physiological role. To investigate the physiological function of p32, we determined the intracellular localization of p32. The fractionation of cells, fluorescent immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopic immunostaining show that p32 is exclusively localized in the mitochondrial matrix. We cloned a Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of human p32 gene, referred to yeast p30 gene. The yeast p30 protein is also localized in the mitochondrial matrix. The disruption of the p30 gene caused the growth retardation of yeast cells in a glycerol medium but not in a glucose medium, i.e. the impairment of the mitochondrial ATP synthesis. The growth impairment was restored by the introduction of the human p32 cDNA, indicating that p30 is a functional yeast counterpart of human p32. Taken together, both p32 and p30 reside in mitochondrial matrix and play an important role in maintaining mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24363-24370
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume272
Issue number39
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 26 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'p32 protein, a splicing factor 2-associated protein, is localized in mitochondrial matrix and is functionally important in maintaining oxidative phosphorylation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this