Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine functions in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis

T. Ito, L. Lee, M. Hijioka, H. Igarashi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinctive type of pancreatitis, and it is considered that the pathogenesis of AIP involves autoimmune mechanisms [1–6]. Recently, AIP has been considered as a systemic disease because it is often accompanied by various extrapancreatic lesions including cholangitis, sialadenitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, hilar lymphadenopathy, and chronic thyroiditis [7–11]. Furthermore, AIP is often associated with pancreatic exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. Recently, AIP is known to have two clinical and histological subtypes [12, 13], and the international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) published in 2012 [14] enabled us to classify these subtypes into type 1 and type 2. Patients with type 1 AIP often show accompanying extrapancreatic lesions but seldom reveal abdominal pain. On the other hand, patients with type 2 AIP commonly have abdominal pain and sometimes accompany acute pancreatitis. In the present manuscript, we focus on the endocrine and exocrine functions associated with type 1 AIP according to the revised Japanese consensus guideline for management of AIP [15–17].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAutoimmune Pancreatitis
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages31-35
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9783642550867
ISBN (Print)9783642550850
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

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Pancreatitis
Abdominal Pain
Sialadenitis
Retroperitoneal Fibrosis
Cholangitis
Manuscripts
Guidelines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ito, T., Lee, L., Hijioka, M., & Igarashi, H. (2015). Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine functions in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. In Autoimmune Pancreatitis (pp. 31-35). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-55086-7_5

Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine functions in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. / Ito, T.; Lee, L.; Hijioka, M.; Igarashi, H.

Autoimmune Pancreatitis. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015. p. 31-35.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Ito, T, Lee, L, Hijioka, M & Igarashi, H 2015, Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine functions in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. in Autoimmune Pancreatitis. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 31-35. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-55086-7_5
Ito T, Lee L, Hijioka M, Igarashi H. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine functions in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. In Autoimmune Pancreatitis. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2015. p. 31-35 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-55086-7_5
Ito, T. ; Lee, L. ; Hijioka, M. ; Igarashi, H. / Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine functions in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Autoimmune Pancreatitis. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015. pp. 31-35
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