Paradox of Vaccination: Is Vaccination really effective against avian flu epidemics?

Shingo Iwani, Takafumi Suzuki, Yasuhiro Takeuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although vaccination can be a useful tool for control of avian influenza epidemics, it might engender emergence of a vaccine-resistant strain. Field and experimental studies show that some avian influenza strains acquire resistance ability against vaccination. We investigated, in the context of the emergence of a vaccine-resistant strain, whether a vaccination program can prevent the spread of infectious disease. We also investigated how losses from immunization by vaccination imposed by the resistant strain affect the spread of the disease. Methods and Findings: We designed and analyzed a deterministic compartment model illustrating transmission of vaccine-sensitive and vaccine-resistant strains during a vaccination program. We investigated how the loss of protection effectiveness impacts the program. Results show that a vaccination to prevent the spread of disease can instead spread the disease when the resistant strain is less virulent than the sensitive strain. If the loss is high, the program does not prevent the spread of the resistant strain despite a large prevalence rate of the program. The epidemic's final size can be larger than that before the vaccination program. We propose how to use poor vaccines, which have a large loss, to maximize program effects and describe various program risks, which can be estimated using available epidemiological data. Conclusions: We presented clear and simple concepts to elucidate vaccination program guidelines to avoid negative program effects. Using our theory, monitoring the virulence of the resistant strain and investigating the loss caused by the resistant strain better development of vaccination strategies is possible.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere4915
JournalPloS one
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 18 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Influenza in Birds
avian influenza
Vaccination
Vaccines
vaccination
vaccines
Immunization
Program Evaluation
Monitoring
Communicable Diseases
Virulence
infectious diseases
immunization
virulence
Guidelines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Paradox of Vaccination : Is Vaccination really effective against avian flu epidemics? / Iwani, Shingo; Suzuki, Takafumi; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro.

In: PloS one, Vol. 4, No. 3, e4915, 18.03.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iwani, Shingo ; Suzuki, Takafumi ; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro. / Paradox of Vaccination : Is Vaccination really effective against avian flu epidemics?. In: PloS one. 2009 ; Vol. 4, No. 3.
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